Council committee – Adventurebase100 http://adventurebase100.org/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 17:37:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://adventurebase100.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Council committee – Adventurebase100 http://adventurebase100.org/ 32 32 Municipal boundary review, unsafe and unsightly property discussed at Colchester council committee https://adventurebase100.org/municipal-boundary-review-unsafe-and-unsightly-property-discussed-at-colchester-council-committee/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 21:01:19 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/municipal-boundary-review-unsafe-and-unsightly-property-discussed-at-colchester-council-committee/ TRURO, NS — A review of municipal district boundaries dominated the discussion at the Colchester council committee meeting earlier this month. The municipal boundary review is a necessity imposed by the Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board (NSUARB) to ensure that each district maintains approximately the same number of electors. It must be done every […]]]>

TRURO, NS — A review of municipal district boundaries dominated the discussion at the Colchester council committee meeting earlier this month.

The municipal boundary review is a necessity imposed by the Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board (NSUARB) to ensure that each district maintains approximately the same number of electors. It must be done every eight years. The Municipality of Colchester carried out its last review in 2014.

While most districts fell within the parameters set by the NSUARB (a population of 2,706 per district with a 10% variance), the county. Eric Boutillier’s neighborhood was significantly less populated than the others, resulting in a difference of -16.41%. Councilors Karen MacKenzie, Lisa Patton and Marie Benoit had voter populations slightly above the recommended range. This led the staff to devise several different strategies to remedy this problem.

One strategy suggested by staff was to make a small change to the borders of Districts Nine and 10, displacing 77 voters from the Debert area of ​​the county. Benoit dumb. Victoria Lomond. This would increase Benoit’s variance from 13.05 to 10.9%, increasing Lomond’s from -0.3 to 2.55%.

Another strategy was to adjust the constituency boundaries of MacKenzie and Wade Parker (six and 11 respectively) to give Boutillier a higher voter population. This would impact properties northwest of Pictou Road, from 327 Pictou Road in District 11 to 709 Pictou Road in District Six.

It has also been suggested that the boundaries of District Eight, represented by Coun. Patton, change too. This would cause part of Upper Brookside to be moved to the Boutillier District. If combined with the proposed changes to Districts 6 and 11, this would increase Boutillier’s variance to -0.55% and decrease Patton’s from 12.45 to 4.29%.

Com. Parker said while some populations (such as Debert) will grow over the next eight years due to developments, those targeted for redistricting are not expected to experience the same growth.

“It’s all based on population growth,” Parker said. “In my area, I’m probably not going to see a lot of growth for the simple reason that there isn’t much land left, but there is going to be some growth that’s going to happen in spurts along district one. ”

Parker noted that at the last review, a portion of Pictou Road in Bible Hill that was originally assigned to his district was moved to district one. Now, part of Pictou Road is represented by Parker, while the other part is represented by Boutillier.

“It makes sense to move the last part of my district to district one. When I last campaigned, some residents were very confused as to why the neighbors on the other side were voting in District 1 and not 11.”

Council unanimously decided to direct staff to conduct community consultations on the proposed changes. This requires an extension from the NSUARB since the municipal boundary review process was delayed due to Fiona.

Mayor Christine Blair said if the municipality does not meet the criteria set by the NSUARB, then the council has the power to redistrict it itself.

“I would like to be the master of our own destiny, and not take a group step that only knows the numbers without knowing the area and the people who represent that area,” Blair said.

Dangerous and unsightly property

At the request of council, the municipality’s attorney, Dennis James, has drafted a memo that details the current process for dealing with dangerous and unsightly property, and what the municipality can do to deal with repeat offenders.

Mayor Blair explained the problem facing the municipality.

“What we find with just a few, you can probably count on the fingers of one hand, but some have been very disturbing in that they will repeat themselves,” Blair said. “A few months will pass, and then comes another complaint. Same property. Same problem, or worse.

The document notes that the municipality does not have a by-law that “provides further recourse” and instead relies on the Municipal Government Act (MGA) to deal with derelict property.

It also indicates that only one other municipality, the town of Antigonish, has its own bylaw to deal with unsafe and unsightly properties – others have imposed bylaws regarding grass height and abandoned buildings.

For Colchester County, however, the attorney concluded that a minimum standards bylaw or a derelict building bylaw would not adequately address the repeated problems of unsightly property. The introduction of any regulations could negatively impact rural communities by forcing them to meet urban standards, the document says.

Instead, the memo recommended three options.

The first was to set shorter deadlines for cleaning. Homeowners currently have 30 days to clean their property after receiving notice from an inspector. While the lawyer says the municipality can shorten this period as long as it allows the seven-day appeal period required by the MGA, he also notes that this could increase the burden on municipal staff.

The second was to institute tougher fines. While the MGA allows a range of $100 to $10,000, the municipality should pass a bylaw that sets a lower minimum standard.

Blair mentioned that in the case of summary offenses, the fines are so small that they are not worth pursuing.

“If you want to sue, you’re not looking for $100 for a summary ticket — you’re looking for thousands, if you take it to court,” Blair explained. “What’s the value if you have someone who can’t pay a summary ticket?”

The third option was to recover costs more quickly.

From now on, the costs of dealing with dangerous and unsightly goods are the responsibility of the owner and are included in the collection of regular taxes. The lawyer suggested the municipality sell a property if the fines remain unpaid for more than a year. The municipality could also collect enforcement fees through an expedited tax process, according to the document.

There was discussion about developing a bylaw to help maintain a standard across the municipality, possibly through a derelict building bylaw or a minimum standards bylaw. However, some advisers pointed out that these regulations could have negative effects on people living in rural areas, just as the lawyer suggested.

Com. Patton explained at the meeting while she is uncomfortable walking the line between urban and rural standards, the council needs teeth to deal with repeat offences.

Com. Tim Johnson argued that while he supports the idea of ​​giving the municipality more power to deal with repeat offenders, it all depends on the language they use, saying they need to find meaning in what is unsightly.

A motion was passed for staff and counsel to explore the matter further, including the possibility of drafting a derelict building or minimum standards bylaw.

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Birmingham council committee approves deal to keep Magic City Classic at Legion Field until 2026 https://adventurebase100.org/birmingham-council-committee-approves-deal-to-keep-magic-city-classic-at-legion-field-until-2026/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 17:00:16 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/birmingham-council-committee-approves-deal-to-keep-magic-city-classic-at-legion-field-until-2026/ Left to Right – Carol Clarke, Bham Alderman, Dr. Daniel Wims, President of Alabama A&M, Randall Woodfin, Mayor of Bham, Big Boi, Dr. Quinton Ross, President of Alabama State University , and Terri Sewell, U.S. Representative Historic Legion Field, which turns 95 on Nov. 19, is on track to host the Magic City Classic for […]]]>
Left to Right – Carol Clarke, Bham Alderman, Dr. Daniel Wims, President of Alabama A&M, Randall Woodfin, Mayor of Bham, Big Boi, Dr. Quinton Ross, President of Alabama State University , and Terri Sewell, U.S. Representative

Historic Legion Field, which turns 95 on Nov. 19, is on track to host the Magic City Classic for the next four years through 2026.

Birmingham City Council’s Budget and Finance Committee this week approved a deal to keep the annual interstate rivalry game and festivities going between Alabama A&M University and Alabama State University. A vote on the deal by the full board will take place at the November 22 meeting.

New classic Magic City arrangement

birmingham
Mayor Randall Woodfin signs the agreement to keep the Magic City Classic at Legion Field until 2022. Photo courtesy of the City of Birmingham

“The Classic is steeped in the culture of Birmingham,” Crystal Smitherman, Birmingham City Councilor, told Bham Now. “It’s more than a game, it’s an experience. I am delighted that we can continue this 80+ year tradition of being two rival schools in a central and neutral location. It is important that we support our HBCUs, which produce some of our greatest leaders, scientists, technologists, innovators and trendsetters.

The two universities received $400,000 from the city after the game this year. Under the new four-year contract, each university will receive $500,000 per year until the contract expires in 2026.

“Everything in the actual agreement is pretty much carbon copies of everything that’s already been agreed, from transportation to in-kind services for police and fire, EMS, etc. The only change is the financial contribution to both schools,” Birmingham City Chief Operating Officer Chaz Mitchell told the council’s budget and finance committee on Monday.

Legion Field Condition

Legion Field
Mural inside the press box at Legion Field. (Pat Byington/Bham Now)

Asked about the state of Legion Field by Councilman LaTonya Tate, Mitchell pointed to several recent upgrades that have been made to the “Old Gray Lady”, including:

  • New modern LED lights
  • New turf approved for FIFA international football matches
  • Modernization of toilets

In addition to major upgrades, Bham Now also reported in December 2021 on plans for 2022 to prepare the stadium for the World Games.

Was the protective stage ever an option?

USFL
Scenes from the Birmingham Stallions’ inaugural USFL game against the New Jersey Generals at Protective Stadium on April 16, 2022. (Jacob Blankenship/Bham Now)

With the Magic City Classic contract between the city and the schools expiring this year, there was speculation that the game would move to the new Protection Stadium or the A&M and ASU campuses.

Participation in this year’s game, which exceeded 67,000 (and that’s not including the thousands of fans stalking outside Legion Field), seemed to render this discussion moot, since Protective holds about 45,000 and each stadium on campus reaches a capacity of about 25,000 fans.

More than a game

Councilor Smitherman emphasized the need to have both the Legion Ground and the Protection Stadium available.

“It also shows that Legion Field is a useful and prime venue for major sporting events. We have to remember that we have two stadiums-Protective and Legion Field, both of which produce millions of dollars for the city. Go Hornets and go Bulldogs!

Tell us about your fondest memory of the Magic City Classic. Tag us on social media with your favorite story @bhamnow

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Denver Park Hill Golf Course Proposal Goes to Board Committee Vote https://adventurebase100.org/denver-park-hill-golf-course-proposal-goes-to-board-committee-vote/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 18:24:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/denver-park-hill-golf-course-proposal-goes-to-board-committee-vote/ On November 8, the Denver City Council’s Land Use, Transportation, and Infrastructure Committee voted 5-2 to send the proposed Park Hill Golf Course development to the full council for consideration. The final council vote will take place on December 5. Council members Paul Kashmann and Candi CdeBaca were the “no”. Read the original story posted […]]]>
On November 8, the Denver City Council’s Land Use, Transportation, and Infrastructure Committee voted 5-2 to send the proposed Park Hill Golf Course development to the full council for consideration. The final council vote will take place on December 5. Council members Paul Kashmann and Candi CdeBaca were the “no”.

Read the original story posted at 6am today below:

Although it’s a monumental day for American politics, a Denver City Council committee will take its first vote on a very important local issue: what to do with the Park Hill golf course.

The future of the 155-acre property has been one of the hottest issues in Denver politics for the past few years. There have been wars of words and competing ballot measures, all culminating in this first vote of the council’s Land Use, Transport and Infrastructure Committee, which will decide whether or not to give the green light to a mixed-use development plan for the golf course.

Origins of the conflict

Throughout the Park Hill Golf Course’s long history as a functioning golf facility, the City of Denver has considered the property for potential purchase from the Clayton Trust. But with the price out of reach, the city, under Mayor Wellington Webb, opted in 1997 to place a conservation easement on the property instead to ensure its continued existence as a functioning golf course.

In operation since the 1930s, the golf course saw its last golfers depart in 2018. It then closed as the City of Denver began to pass through the property during its Platte Stormwater Retention Project in Park Hill.

In 2019, Westside Investment Partners, the developer also overseeing the redevelopment of the Loretto Heights campus, purchased the Park Hill golf course for $24 million.

To proceed with any development on the property, Westside needed a decision from a judge and a vote from the Denver City Council to lift the conservation easement, which prohibited development. But the situation quickly became complicated.

Opponents of development

A handful of Park Hill residents, along with Webb and former state legislator Penfield Tate, came together to oppose any development on the Park Hill golf course and formed Save Open Space Denver. The group took a no-compromise position: not a single foot of the property should be paved. Instead, Save Open Space Denver lobbied to have the golf course turned into a city park. This position ran counter to Westside’s vision: the development company wanted to turn the property into a mixed-use development with components of affordable housing, a grocery store, and open space.

The two sides – Westside and the City of Denver vs. Save Open Space Denver – began to argue over what was actually allowed by the conservation easement. Westside and the city attorney’s office said the conservation easement only allowed primary use as a golf course, so even turning the land into a park would require lifting the easement. On the other hand, Save Open Space Denver claimed that the conservation easement allowed for other types of open space uses, so the land could be turned into a park without lifting it.

Competing electoral measures

Save Open Space Denver won a measure in the November 2021 ballot that would require a citywide vote in order to lift any conservation easements. But there just happens to be one conservation easement in Denver: on the Park Hill golf course.

Westside pushed his own ballot proposal that, if passed, would have exempted the Save Open Space Denver measure from applying to the Park Hill Golf Course conservation easement.

In November 2021, voters passed the SOS Denver measure and rejected the Westside-funded measure. It put Westside back to the drawing board and ensured Denver voters have a voice in the ultimate use of the Park Hill golf course.

Proposal

Over the past year, the Westside plan has transformed. The latest proposal still calls for a mix of residential, commercial and open space on the property, and 25% of the units would be affordable. But it also sets aside 100 acres as open space – up from the election proposal of 60 acres before November 2021 – including 95 acres that would be turned into a contiguous regional park. Of these 95 acres, 25 are covered by a floodwater retention area easement, which is part of the Platte Stormwater Retention Project at Park Hill. However, the detention area itself is less than twenty acres, according to Kenneth Ho, Westside’s lead developer working on the project, and all of that area can be developed and made accessible to the park with investment from the city, as long as there is no structure built on it.

But Yes for Parks and Open Space, the new name for Save Open Space Denver, still rejects the proposal. Instead, the group wants to wait for the new mayor and council members taking office in July 2023 before anything else is decided on the Park Hill golf course.

“There’s no rush to do it now. Why don’t you let the next administration and the city council deal with it?” Tate asks.

Still, Westside and the city are moving forward with the proposal.

Next steps

Today, November 8, the Committee on Land Use Planning, Transport and Infrastructure will vote on a Small Area Plan for Park Hill Golf Course, which contains Westside’s proposal. If LUTI approves the plan, it will go to the full council for a first reading on November 28 and a final hearing and vote on December 5.

If the plan clears that hurdle, on Dec. 13, LUTI will consider a request to rezone the property, in addition to returning a proposal to the ballot for voters to lift the conservation easement that rests on the golf course. The Denver City Council would have a hearing and a final vote on those two items on Jan. 23.

If council approves both, then a proposal to lift the conservation easement resting on the Park Hill golf course would go to voters in April 2023, at the same time as they choose a new mayor and council representatives.

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Pasadena Water and Power Reports to Pasadena Council Drinking Water Committee – Pasadena Now https://adventurebase100.org/pasadena-water-and-power-reports-to-pasadena-council-drinking-water-committee-pasadena-now/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 14:06:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/pasadena-water-and-power-reports-to-pasadena-council-drinking-water-committee-pasadena-now/ Pasadena Water and Power submits its 2022 Public Health Goals (PHG) report to the Municipal Services Committee of the City Council on Tuesday, November 8, as required by the California Environmental Protection Agency under the California Health and Safety Code, community water services like PWP. City Council is expected to hold a public hearing and […]]]>

Pasadena Water and Power submits its 2022 Public Health Goals (PHG) report to the Municipal Services Committee of the City Council on Tuesday, November 8, as required by the California Environmental Protection Agency under the California Health and Safety Code, community water services like PWP.

City Council is expected to hold a public hearing and receive public comment on the PWP-recommended 2022 PHG report in early December, before allowing it to be forwarded to CalEPA.

The PHG report describes what is in Pasadena’s drinking water: the “presence of constituents” – including contaminants – in the treated water of PWPs that have concentrations above the PHG levels established by CalEPA and maximum contaminant level (MCLG) objectives established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These goals are the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected health risk.

The report includes a description of the types of public health risks, methods of treatment, if any, and associated estimated costs.

Per CalEPA requirements, PWP should provide the public with an opportunity to review and comment on the PHG report. The city council is also required to accept and approve the PHG report.

To view the PHG report, visit the PWP webpage in the water quality section at http://www.PWPweb.com/WaterQuality/.

Besides the PHG report, PWP is also required to publish a Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) on an annual basis and distribute it to its clients. PWP released its 2021 CCR on July 1. It is accessible via www.pwpweb.com/ccr2021 and is also available in the PWP water quality section at www.PWPweb.com/waterquality/.

Pasadena derives more than 60% of the city’s water supply from imported water purchased from the Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of Southern California, while the remainder comes from local groundwater sources.

The city maintains eighteen groundwater wells, nine of which are considered “inactive” by the Drinking Water Division (DDW) of the State Water Resources Control Board of California (SWRCB). The city also has five interconnections with MWD and several others with other water retailers.

In the PHG report for the city council, PWP said the city’s drinking water meets all California SWRCB and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) DDW drinking water standards established to protect public health. All constituents that were identified in the report are below the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) after treatment through the city’s Monk Hill Treatment System (MHTS) or other rigorous blending plans. Reducing constituents further would amount to an additional treatment process, which would be costly for the city, PWP said.

Tuesday’s municipal services committee meeting begins at 4 p.m. Members of the public can access it by

http://pasadena.granicus.com/MediaPlayer.php?publish_id=9 and www.pasadenamedia.org.

Public comments are welcome. Anyone wishing to make a public comment during the meeting is advised to submit a speaker card to www.cityofpasadena.net/commissions/public-comment.

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Board committee to assess solar power delivery contract that could cost $132 million over 20 years – Pasadena Now https://adventurebase100.org/board-committee-to-assess-solar-power-delivery-contract-that-could-cost-132-million-over-20-years-pasadena-now/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 14:04:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/board-committee-to-assess-solar-power-delivery-contract-that-could-cost-132-million-over-20-years-pasadena-now/ Pasadena Water and Power recommends that the Municipal Services Committee of the City Council approve a contract with the Southern California Public Power Authority for the purchase of renewable energy and capacity from Sapphire Solar, LLC, which includes the daily delivery of a maximum of 39 megawatts of solar photovoltaic energy and up to four […]]]>

Pasadena Water and Power recommends that the Municipal Services Committee of the City Council approve a contract with the Southern California Public Power Authority for the purchase of renewable energy and capacity from Sapphire Solar, LLC, which includes the daily delivery of a maximum of 39 megawatts of solar photovoltaic energy and up to four hours of dispatchable battery energy storage not exceeding 19.67 MW during a 20-year contract term commencing December 31, 2026.

The proposed contract will be discussed on Tuesday, November 8, when the Municipal Services Committee meets at 4 p.m. The recommendation is expected to reach City Council in early December.

If approved, the contract would be submitted to the full city council for final review and possible approval.

Sapphire Solar, LLC, is the originator of the Sapphire Solar Photovoltaic and Battery Energy Storage System – also referred to as the Sapphire Project, a planned development located in Riverside County with a rated capacity of 117 megawatts of solar generation and 59 MW of battery storage. Project Sapphire is expected to enter service in late 2026.

Through an agreement with the Southern California Public Power Authority (SCPPA), a Joint Powers Authority and a government entity comprised of eleven municipal utilities (including PWP) and one irrigation district, one-third of the capacity generated by the Sapphire project will be received by Pasadena beginning December 31, 2026, if the contract is approved. Two other members of the SCPPA will share the balance balance.

PWP said the connection with Project Sapphire will increase PWP’s Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) portfolio to help meet national and local targets, and will also support reliability by providing approximately 25MW of capacity, partially offsetting capacity of 108 MW that will be phased out with the termination of Pasadena’s interest in the Intermountain Power Project (IPP) in June 2027.

The termination of PWP’s 108 MW interest in the IPP is a commitment the City of Pasadena expressed in the Power Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) that the City Council approved in 2018. In addition to the termination of the IPP , PWP said other energy resource contracts worth at least 40 MW expire by the end of 2030, requiring the utility to secure replacement renewable capacity.

California has set ambitious targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. With SB 350, passed in 2015, the state requires that 65% of all renewable energy contracts be long-term, lasting at least 10 years, and represent a diverse set of resources and types. of resources. Additionally, the SB 100, approved in 2018, requires 60% of retail sales to be powered by renewable resources by 2030, with a target of 100% carbon-free delivered energy by 2045.

To replace the capacity represented by the IPP and other expiring contracts, PWP said it plans to procure a mix of short-term and long-term renewable energy contracts that support reliability, meet future state compliance requirements and limit potential exposure to blocked investments.

In January, the SCPPA issued a Request for Proposals via its website for Renewable Energy Resources and Energy Storage Solutions. In the evaluation process, which included Pasadena and two other SCPPA members, more than 20 proposals were reviewed based on RFP criteria, such as resource type and location, reliability of electricity, contract duration and comparability with existing member contracts.

The proposal for the Sapphire project was submitted by EDF Renouvelables, with whom SCPPA will contract. PWP said the proposal offered the most competitive price and was ultimately deemed the most responsive as it qualifies for RPS compliance and will provide over 25MW of resource adequacy capacity to help meet the requirements set by the California Independent System Operator.

“PWP is not aware of any local companies that are developing large-scale renewable energy projects with associated environmental attributes and therefore has not conducted any local outreach,” a PWP statement read.

The Sapphire project is located near PWP’s service area, PWP added. The project is expected to start supplying electricity in 2027 when the IPP contract expires. Pricing for solar and battery energy storage components in the contract will ultimately be based on adjusted development costs.

According to a PWP projection of solar power and energy storage costs, the City could spend between $4.7 million and $6.6 million per year if it proceeds with the SCPPA Sapphire project contract. Final pricing will be determined once the project is complete, PWP said.

“It is respectfully requested that a 20-year contract be approved with SCPPA for Pasadena’s share of the Sapphire Renewable Energy Project beginning in 2027 for a final amount to be determined once full development costs are finalized. known,” the PWP report said.

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Board Committee to Discuss $45 Million Bond Proposal | New https://adventurebase100.org/board-committee-to-discuss-45-million-bond-proposal-new/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/board-committee-to-discuss-45-million-bond-proposal-new/ Editor’s note: This article is updated to include that the property tax will increase monthly based on the value of the property. City staff will outline a plan to secure a $45 million bond program to repair and replace dozens of crumbling bridges in Norman, the Community Planning and Transportation Committee agenda says. Although the […]]]>

Editor’s note: This article is updated to include that the property tax will increase monthly based on the value of the property.

City staff will outline a plan to secure a $45 million bond program to repair and replace dozens of crumbling bridges in Norman, the Community Planning and Transportation Committee agenda says.

Although the city has a bridge maintenance program, it is not dealing with the damage to aging bridges, Public Works Director Shawn O’Leary said.

The $45 million bond would replace 10 bridges and rehabilitate or maintain nine others. On a 10-year bond, average property taxes could increase monthly by $4.54 on a $100,000 home, $7.01 on a $150,000 home, and $9.49 on a $150,000 home. $200,000, according to the staff presentation.

The committee’s agenda for Thursday’s meeting lists the bridge maintenance program for the current fiscal year as $750,000. A 2021 report found the city has 80 nationally registered bridges, but 11 are functionally obsolete, five are structurally deficient, and another 15 are near structurally deficient, the staff report said.

“I hope CP&T (committee) members will discuss possible next steps with this program, including a timeline for a potential citywide election,” O’Leary said in a statement to The Transcript.

City staff continue to seek additional funding sources, including American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds, the director of public works said.

“The city applied for ARPA funds administered by the State of Oklahoma for the replacement of the bridges, but that request was not approved,” O’Leary said. “City staff are currently exploring other federal funding programs that appear to be available for local bridge maintenance projects. However, the city’s needs for bridge replacements seem so great that federal funds are unlikely to meet all of them.

The Board asked staff at the July Goal Setting Retreat to explore a link and timeline for an election.

In September 2021 the council was forced to fund repairs to the Imhoff Bridge when the supports underneath collapsed due to soil erosion along the creek.

The cost to repair the bridge was $370,000.

The Imhoff Bridge is one of twelve others cited in a 2019 Oklahoma Department of Transportation Bridge Safety Inspection Report as “structurally deficient,” according to city records at the time.

The Department of Transportation inspects all public bridges over 20 feet in length.

Besides the Imhoff Bridge, two bridges have closed since 2016 because they posed “a safety hazard”, the staff report said. The Havenbrook Street and Main Street bridges were also closed for repairs.

Six bridges posted load limits due to structural conditions, shows a map included in the staff presentation. Three of those bridges are in Ward 5, including one that only allows up to four tons, which rules out ambulances, delivery trucks, school buses, charter buses and heavy construction equipment, says The report.

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LA City Council Committee Censors Kevin De León and Gil Cedillo – Annenberg Media https://adventurebase100.org/la-city-council-committee-censors-kevin-de-leon-and-gil-cedillo-annenberg-media/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/la-city-council-committee-censors-kevin-de-leon-and-gil-cedillo-annenberg-media/ The LA City Council votes unanimously to censure council members Kevin De León and Gil Cedillo. Hear what protesters at the meeting have to say about this decision. California State Assemblywoman Wendy Carrillo tells us about a $17.2 million state grant that will be earmarked for an immigrant mental health center. RSV, COVID-19 and influenza […]]]>

The LA City Council votes unanimously to censure council members Kevin De León and Gil Cedillo. Hear what protesters at the meeting have to say about this decision.

California State Assemblywoman Wendy Carrillo tells us about a $17.2 million state grant that will be earmarked for an immigrant mental health center.

RSV, COVID-19 and influenza are on the rise across the county. Listen to a public health expert explain what you can do to avoid the triple threat of respiratory disease.

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GoLocalProv | Superman Building Deal Approved by Providence City Council Committee https://adventurebase100.org/golocalprov-superman-building-deal-approved-by-providence-city-council-committee/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 08:15:53 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/golocalprov-superman-building-deal-approved-by-providence-city-council-committee/ Tuesday, October 18, 2022 GoLocalProv Sales Team View larger + Superman Building PHOTO: GoLocal Drone The City of Providence’s mega-grant for the vacant Superman Building was approved by the Providence City Council’s finance committee Monday night. After a two-hour public hearing and testimony from interest groups and citizens, the City Council’s Finance Committee has approved […]]]>

Tuesday, October 18, 2022

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Superman Building PHOTO: GoLocal Drone

The City of Providence’s mega-grant for the vacant Superman Building was approved by the Providence City Council’s finance committee Monday night.

After a two-hour public hearing and testimony from interest groups and citizens, the City Council’s Finance Committee has approved a 30-year Tax Stabilization Agreement (TSA) order between the City and High Rock Westminster Street LLC, owner of 111 Westminster Street, aka, the Superman building.

The 30-year agreement is divided into three ten-year tax installments:

GET THE LATEST NEWS HERE – SIGN UP FOR GLOCAL’S FREE DAILY EBLAST

“The City has determined the stabilized amount of taxes to be paid by the Owner in respect of the Property, notwithstanding the assessment of the Property or the tax rate then in effect as follows:

For the 2023 tax years up to and including the 2033 tax year, the owner must make a tax payment equal to the taxes due and payable for the appraisal value on December 31, 2022 multiplied by the rate of taxation then in force for the taxation year (hereinafter the “ ”). For the next ten (10) taxation years, the owner will pay the basic assessment tax plus two hundred and fifty thousand dollars ($250,000.00).

For the last ten tax years, the Owner will pay the Basic Assessment Tax plus a percentage of the difference between the Basic Assessment Tax on the Property and the taxes due and payable on the then current value of the property. Property valuation multiplied by the current -rate.”

See the TSA HERE.

View larger +

Tax stabilization payment schedule

The building has been vacant for more than eight years.

The thirty-year TSA is unprecedented and is the third of three major taxpayer-funded incentives to which the administration of Mayor Jorge Elorza has committed – the city is providing developers with a $10 million loan at a rate of 1% interest and a $5 million grant.

Combined with other federal and state grants and tax credits, taxpayers underwrite approximately $80 million of the agreement.

“We heard from many members of the community tonight about this proposed redevelopment of the Superman Building, a massive skyscraper that has sat idle and dark for almost ten years. There is no doubt that the property has become an eye black butter in the center of the capital, ”said Councilor Jo-Ann Ryan (Ward 5), chair of the finance committee.

The project which claims a budget of $223 million raises many questions – in particular, how a building of this size and scope and vacant for almost nine years could be rehabilitated at a cost per square foot of less than $400. while similar projects in other cities cost more. from $600 to $1,000 per square foot.

The proposed project provides for 285 residential apartments, of which 20% of the units are considered affordable.

The building owner is committed to combining commercial and community spaces in the Grand Banking Hall, thus opening the building’s doors to all. A “Buy Providence” initiative is also included in the TSA, where the owner will make “good faith efforts” to purchase building materials, use equipment and services from vendors in town.

The ordinance now moves before the full city council and requires two passes.

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GoLocalProv | Superman Building Deal Approved by Providence City Council Committee https://adventurebase100.org/golocalprov-superman-building-deal-approved-by-providence-city-council-committee-2/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 08:15:53 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/golocalprov-superman-building-deal-approved-by-providence-city-council-committee-2/ Tuesday, October 18, 2022 GoLocalProv Sales Team View larger + Superman Building PHOTO: GoLocal Drone The City of Providence’s mega-grant for the vacant Superman Building was approved by the Providence City Council’s finance committee Monday night. After a two-hour public hearing and testimony from interest groups and citizens, the City Council’s Finance Committee has approved […]]]>

Tuesday, October 18, 2022

View larger +

Superman Building PHOTO: GoLocal Drone

The City of Providence’s mega-grant for the vacant Superman Building was approved by the Providence City Council’s finance committee Monday night.

After a two-hour public hearing and testimony from interest groups and citizens, the City Council’s Finance Committee has approved a 30-year Tax Stabilization Agreement (TSA) order between the City and High Rock Westminster Street LLC, owner of 111 Westminster Street, aka, the Superman building.

The 30-year agreement is divided into three ten-year tax installments:

GET THE LATEST NEWS HERE – SIGN UP FOR GLOCAL’S FREE DAILY EBLAST

“The City has determined the stabilized amount of taxes to be paid by the Owner in respect of the Property, notwithstanding the assessment of the Property or the tax rate then in effect as follows:

For the 2023 tax years up to and including the 2033 tax year, the owner must make a tax payment equal to the taxes due and payable for the appraisal value on December 31, 2022 multiplied by the rate of taxation then in force for the taxation year (hereinafter the “ ”). For the next ten (10) taxation years, the owner will pay the basic assessment tax plus two hundred and fifty thousand dollars ($250,000.00).

For the last ten tax years, the Owner will pay the Basic Assessment Tax plus a percentage of the difference between the Basic Assessment Tax on the Property and the taxes due and payable on the then current value of the property. Property valuation multiplied by the current -rate.”

See the TSA HERE.

View larger +

Tax stabilization payment schedule

The building has been vacant for more than eight years.

The thirty-year TSA is unprecedented and is the third of three major taxpayer-funded incentives to which the administration of Mayor Jorge Elorza has committed – the city is providing developers with a $10 million loan at a rate of 1% interest and a $5 million grant.

Combined with other federal and state grants and tax credits, taxpayers underwrite approximately $80 million of the agreement.

“We heard from many members of the community tonight about this proposed redevelopment of the Superman Building, a massive skyscraper that has sat idle and dark for almost ten years. There is no doubt that the property has become an eye black butter in the center of the capital, ”said Councilor Jo-Ann Ryan (Ward 5), chair of the finance committee.

The project which claims a budget of $223 million raises many questions – in particular, how a building of this size and scope and vacant for almost nine years could be rehabilitated at a cost per square foot of less than $400. while similar projects in other cities cost more. from $600 to $1,000 per square foot.

The proposed project provides for 285 residential apartments, of which 20% of the units are considered affordable.

The building owner is committed to combining commercial and community spaces in the Grand Banking Hall, thus opening the building’s doors to all. A “Buy Providence” initiative is also included in the TSA, where the owner will make “good faith efforts” to purchase building materials, use equipment and services from vendors in town.

The ordinance now moves before the full city council and requires two passes.

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Board committee recommends ARPA funds for projects helping homeless Springfieldians https://adventurebase100.org/board-committee-recommends-arpa-funds-for-projects-helping-homeless-springfieldians/ Thu, 13 Oct 2022 11:27:07 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/board-committee-recommends-arpa-funds-for-projects-helping-homeless-springfieldians/ A Springfield City Council committee has finalized recommendations to allocate the remainder of their available federal ARPA funds — dividing $7 million to address homelessness in the community. The federal Pandemic Recovery Act allocated $40 million to Springfield, which the city mostly allocated last summer. They have set aside funds intended to address homelessness to […]]]>

A Springfield City Council committee has finalized recommendations to allocate the remainder of their available federal ARPA funds — dividing $7 million to address homelessness in the community.

The federal Pandemic Recovery Act allocated $40 million to Springfield, which the city mostly allocated last summer. They have set aside funds intended to address homelessness to receive more community proposals to address the problem.

At its Oct. 11 meeting, the city council’s ARPA review committee voted to recommend the allocation of approximately $7 million in funds to support homeless services and affordable housing projects. . A council bill is being drafted for the city council to consider at its October 17 meeting.

The proposal to Council will include recommending $3 million for the Community Partnership of the Ozarks to build a Goal-Based Day Center; approximately $2.8 million to complete a previously approved Federal Investment Partnership US bailout project; allocation of $2.2 million for the creation of a non-collective shelter; $650,000 for respite care services for the homeless; and about $550,000 for affordable home ownership.

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