Council student – Adventurebase100 http://adventurebase100.org/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 03:00:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://adventurebase100.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Council student – Adventurebase100 http://adventurebase100.org/ 32 32 Richmond City Council and School Board Continue Discussions on George Wythe in Joint Meeting https://adventurebase100.org/richmond-city-council-and-school-board-continue-discussions-on-george-wythe-in-joint-meeting/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 02:58:11 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/richmond-city-council-and-school-board-continue-discussions-on-george-wythe-in-joint-meeting/ RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) – The construction of a new George Wythe High School has been the center of attention at many local government meetings. Tonight’s public agenda for the Town of Richmond Education Pact quarterly meeting was very open and school construction was a big part of the first half of the meeting. Richmond Public […]]]>

RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) – The construction of a new George Wythe High School has been the center of attention at many local government meetings. Tonight’s public agenda for the Town of Richmond Education Pact quarterly meeting was very open and school construction was a big part of the first half of the meeting.

Richmond Public Schools Superintendent Jason Kamras said the school district had submitted its request for proposals for a new George Wythe High School, which included prototypes for the new building.

When Kamras said prototypes had been submitted, city council members reacted. Stephanie Lynch raised concerns that the community was supposed to be involved in building the new school and these proposals were sent out effortlessly to garner different opinions. Katherine Jordan also expressed her frustration at the lack of community engagement saying she was “just a little hot” about it.

Kamras said there was still room for community engagement in the plans and that they would participate later. He said the preliminary prototype incorporates community uses as well as school functions.

The group remains divided on the size of the school building. At present, the school board is working on the construction of a school that can accommodate 1,600 students. City council members, including Lynch, Jordan and Mike Jones, all said they feared George Wythe High School would become overcrowded.

Jonathan Young, a school board member, spoke in favor of the 1,600-person capacity, saying Richmond Public Schools already had 2,500 high school places in the school district and George Wythe High School had 2,500 places in the school district. currently 1,300 students.

School board member Kenya Gibson said when city council determined plans to build schools dollars were wasted, obstacles stood in the way and timelines for new projects were set too far. She called on Mayor Levar Stoney to respect the school board and its decisions.

Another school board member, Dawn Page, said it was time to take the personalities out of the school building discussion and create a plan. Page said if there was no plan in place, children and families would be the losers.

She wasn’t the only school board member who felt there was no plan. Nicole Jones said the school board needs to figure out what it wants the city to be involved in and move forward with a youth-focused plan and conversations.

Shortly before Page and Nicole Jones called for a plan to be drawn up, Jones said families had an alarming number of concerns about the construction project. He said there had been a lot of dancing around the issues and there had been no resolutions to move forward.

“As chairman of the finance committee, I guarantee you that I am prepared to hold on to the funding until we get a plan, until we know where we are going,” Jones said.


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the-telegraph-young-metro Time for fun and holistic growth https://adventurebase100.org/the-telegraph-young-metro-time-for-fun-and-holistic-growth/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 22:18:41 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/the-telegraph-young-metro-time-for-fun-and-holistic-growth/ Birla High School The school recently organized the 13th edition of its Odyssey fest, in association with The Telegraph. Ten schools participated in the online event which featured a mix of pre-registration and live events. The host school was the big winner and presented the trophy to Sushila Birla School for Girls. South City International […]]]>

Birla High School

The school recently organized the 13th edition of its Odyssey fest, in association with The Telegraph. Ten schools participated in the online event which featured a mix of pre-registration and live events.

The host school was the big winner and presented the trophy to Sushila Birla School for Girls. South City International School and Modern Girls’ Secondary School became the first and second finalists, respectively. The two-day festival gave students the opportunity to arm themselves with courage during events such as fashion shows, dancing, western music, quizzes and debates.

Offline events included Fashion-i-Con (fashion show), Grooves and Moves (contemporary dance), Band-ish (fusion group), Verse-a-Style (creative writing), Tech Trek (app development) and Amaze-On (marketing product).

The first live event from day one was Humor-Us, a humorous event. It was the first time that class XI pupil Krish Kalwani from the host school participated in the event. “I was nervous. But it was a great experience,” said the winner of the event. Humor set the tone for the party. It was followed by a transgressing debate – Double Cross – where each school had a topic and three minutes to speak for and against.

The last live event of the day was Hint-Rospect, or a scavenger hunt for school officials.

The second day started with the final rounds of In-Quizition (quiz) where six schools fought a close battle. South City International ultimately won it.

After a brief hiatus, indie pop singer Anuv Jain wowed the kids with his online performance. “It was not easy to organize such a big event online. We grew up planning events, negotiating with sponsors and revisiting these beloved halls, ”said Class XII student Devangshu Choudhary, who was also the festival president.

Principal Loveleen Saigal said: “Odyssey, our biennial festival, is one of our school’s most anticipated flagship events. Not having a festival this year would have disappointed the boys. We therefore took up the challenge of hosting it virtually. It was a huge learning experience. We missed the electric atmosphere of our auditorium, but we are happy to have been able to virtually put on a good show.

Delhi Public School, Durgapur

The school recently hosted an online investiture ceremony for the 2021-22 academic term. The event aims to instill leadership qualities among children. The ceremony for the junior and senior sections took place on the same day. Eighteen students from Classes II to V were selected for the Junior Student Council, while 26 students from Classes VI to XII were selected for the Senior Student Council.

Student council members have taken an oath to uphold the highest ideals of the institute, to do justice to all the responsibilities vested in them, and to uphold the vision and mission of the school in every way possible.

The day began with the welcome song, Believe in your school, by the school choir. A dance performance based on Rabindranath Tagore’s song, Oi mahamanab ashe, was also put on by the girls in the senior section to echo the energy and radiance of a leader. “Before being a leader, success is about growing. When you become a leader, success is about making others grow. Leadership is a quality that nourishes itself and has its seeds sown in childhood itself. We are opening the window of opportunity for student council members as early as class II to prepare as future world leaders. Their actions, their deeds make their comrades dream and learn more until success is achieved, ”said director Umesh Chand Jaiswal.

La Martinière for Girls

Science quiz, roundtable on Covid-19 vaccines and brainstorming session on ocean pollution – students discussed the latest concepts and technologies at Poiesis 2021, an inter-school festival recently organized by the science club of La Martinière for the girls. The one-day virtual event for classes VI to XII celebrated the spirit of integration between the different disciplines. Guest of Honor Madhumanjari Mandal Choubey, Principal of Scottish Church College, has published the fifth edition of Natural Sciences, a student-published journal.

A multitude of events were organized for students from the five participating schools. The youngest had fun in Just A Minute and Scienceplanation, where scientific concepts were developed through presentations. Seniors participated in Scientivity (making short films), Mind Fizz (science quiz), Zero Hour (crisis solution) and a roundtable on Covid-19 vaccine technology.

At Zero Hour, students had to find a solution to ocean pollution, while during the roundtable, each speaker was to talk about the pandemic and available vaccines, followed by a round of questions. “Our science festival was an exciting event that fostered experiential learning among the students. When students are locked in four walls, this festival is like a breath of fresh air creating opportunities for social contact with peers, resource people from all over the world and to learn from each other’s experiences ”, a said director Rupkatha Sarkar.

Shri Shikshayatan School

The school recently hosted an annual award ceremony, virtually. The pupils of the Council, who passed grades X and XII, were congratulated on their academic and co-school achievements. Principal Sangeeta Tandon presented the school’s annual report. It also shed light on the milestones reached by the school in these difficult times. The best clubs were also rewarded for their activities.

A PowerPoint presentation was shown on occasion, which encapsulated cultural performances such as song and dance. The infusion of performances in Hindi and English proclaimed gratitude and hope. The music and dance performances were an interesting mix of East and West. “The celebration of the annual day is a special day where we recognize a few students who go the extra mile, while investing in themselves. The competition must be with oneself and not with others. It was an eventful day for us, ”said Bratati Bhattacharyya, Secretary General of the Shikshayatan Foundation. The manager said: “It was a satisfying experience for us. It is important to express our gratitude, and above all this pandemic has taught us that whatever the situation, it is imperative to continue in life. I pray that everyone will be happy and safe.


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Tyngsboro High Announces Students of the Month for November – Lowell Sun https://adventurebase100.org/tyngsboro-high-announces-students-of-the-month-for-november-lowell-sun/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 00:15:02 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/tyngsboro-high-announces-students-of-the-month-for-november-lowell-sun/ TYNGSBORO – Tyngsboro High School has announced its students for the month of November. Rosa ChhayCOURTESY TYNGSBORO HIGH SCHOOL Rosa chhay, daughter of Kheng Sengkeomyxay and Limhorng Chhay, is Co-Chair of the Yearbook Club and a member of the National Honor Society, Student Council and PALS. She received the Smith College Book Award, attended the […]]]>

TYNGSBORO – Tyngsboro High School has announced its students for the month of November.

Rosa ChhayCOURTESY TYNGSBORO HIGH SCHOOL

Rosa chhay, daughter of Kheng Sengkeomyxay and Limhorng Chhay, is Co-Chair of the Yearbook Club and a member of the National Honor Society, Student Council and PALS. She received the Smith College Book Award, attended the Hugh O’Brien Youth Leadership Seminar, and served as class president for two years.

Rosa’s volunteer activities include working at a Lowell soup kitchen, city events, Special Olympics, and vacation events at homeless shelters. It aims to build a career in business and promote a more equitable and inclusive environment for women and minorities in the labor market.

Thomas Michaud COURTESY LYNGSBORO HIGH SCHOOL

Thomas Michaud, son of Kathleen and Steve Michaud, is a member of PALS, Senior Sidekicks and the lacrosse and football teams.

Her community service efforts include running a youth lacrosse camp, helping with youth soccer practice, organizing a fundraiser for breast cancer, donating food. for Thanksgiving for the homeless and preparing meals for families in need. His goals include playing lacrosse in college and opening his own business.

Danielle Nicosia COURTESY TYNGSBORO HIGH SCHOOL

Danielle Nicosia, daughter of Nicole and Peter Nicosia, is an honor roll student, founder and president of the Medical Professionals Club, co-chair of the Yearbook Club, member of the Senior Sidekicks, the varsity basketball team and the Amateur Athletic Union Evolution Basketball .

Her community service includes coaching at a youth softball clinic, organizing and training a youth basketball skills camp, and volunteering at Tyngsboro Elementary School. Danielle is a licensed practical nurse and hopes to pursue a career in the medical field.

Mason QuinceCOURTESY TYNGSBORO HIGH SCHOOL

Quince mason, son of Steven and Cheryl Quince, received the Saint Michael’s College Book Award for Scholarship and Service and awards for outstanding achievement in computer science, visual arts and academic excellence.

Mason is the President of the Gender Sexuality Alliance and a member of the Theater Props team. He plans to use his interests in creative writing and painting to become an illustrator.


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Strikers urge Huntington City Council to support blocked resolution https://adventurebase100.org/strikers-urge-huntington-city-council-to-support-blocked-resolution/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 01:28:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/strikers-urge-huntington-city-council-to-support-blocked-resolution/ Huntington City Council rooms were filled Monday night with employees participating in two separate strikes at Cabell Huntington Hospital and Special Metals. Council members considered a resolution that called on the two organizations to come to the negotiating table in good faith. The motion was blocked by Huntington’s legal team for reasons of impartiality. The […]]]>

Huntington City Council rooms were filled Monday night with employees participating in two separate strikes at Cabell Huntington Hospital and Special Metals. Council members considered a resolution that called on the two organizations to come to the negotiating table in good faith.

The motion was blocked by Huntington’s legal team for reasons of impartiality.

The resolution in favor of the strikers was presented by Councilor Bob Bailey. He stressed the importance of “standing behind these people in these pickets. Christmas is coming. […] They need Christmas presents for their children. So I’m only going to pray that you do the right thing. And support these union members. These are our people.

A federal mediator has called on Cabell Huntington Hospital and SEIU to return to the negotiating table on November 30.

Molly Frick, director of human resources at Cabell Huntington Hospital, released a statement Monday. “We look forward to confirmation of our return to the bargaining table,” said Frick. “We presented our latest offering to SEIU District 1199 on November 9th. To date, not only have we not received a counter offer, but we have not received any response. We recognize that a strike is serious business that deserves serious action.

She added: “Work stoppages in hospitals are different from those in industrial facilities. The health and well-being of human lives is the responsibility of the entire team. Many union members told us they were ready to resume patient care and support operations. We encourage SEIU to either respond to our offer or return to the bargaining table, so our team members can get back to work.

SEIU District 1199 organizing director Sherri McKinney argued in a statement that Cabell Huntington Hospital was not really acting in good faith, “when they made a much lower offer than we’ve had for decades. decades and traded on November 3.

“We hope the hospital will do what is fair and equitable and stop this strike in good faith this holiday season for the community of Huntington as a whole, but after numerous misrepresentation to the media and divisive tactics, they have to find another way to do business, ”McKinney said.

Two hospital union workers came to speak to council in support of Bailey’s resolution to support the strikers.

Union worker Trish Burns told City Council how her sudden loss of health care affected her 25-year-old son. “He’s a full-time student. He worked full time to pay for his studies. Last week he was admitted to the hospital without insurance because Cabell ripped off my insurance.

The Town of Huntington

Trish Burns speaking at City Council meeting 11/22-2021

Council member Tia Rambaugh called on her colleagues to take a stand. “At the end of the day, I think the governance and administration shouldn’t remain impartial in these situations because this is our community,” Rambaugh said.

Despite her background in business, she argued that it was unethical to remain silent on the sidelines. “You are our employees. We are your neighbors. And it’s important for us to make our opinions known so that the administration of these companies can potentially recognize that they are not working in silos, that we all need to work together and that our opinions make sense.

Councilor Patrick Jones was the last to speak on the resolution. With tears in his eyes, Jones argued that it was not unreasonable to demand higher compensation to keep pace with inflation. “Their children, whom I see every day in the halls of our schools as I work, can enjoy this holiday season in the same way with a sense of security and peace that the families of those in charge of these institutions will certainly appreciate. Jones said.

Huntington City Council Meeting 22-11-2021 3

Town of Huntington

Huntington City Councilor Patrick Jones

Council members did not officially take sides with either the workers or the companies. It is the 53rd day since the start of the Special Metals strike, and it is the 20th day of the Cabell Huntington Hospital strike.

Jones has vowed that if there is no deal within the next two weeks, he will bring another resolution to city council.


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Christmas trees arrive at Billings Knights of Columbus fundraiser https://adventurebase100.org/christmas-trees-arrive-at-billings-knights-of-columbus-fundraiser/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 01:07:07 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/christmas-trees-arrive-at-billings-knights-of-columbus-fundraiser/ BILLINGS – An army of students from Billings Central Catholic High School were on site Sunday afternoon at St. Pius X Parish in Billings to help unload and organize a truckload of Christmas trees for a fundraiser. Knights of Columbus Fund. “You smell like the Christmas tree afterwards so it’s always nice,” said John Pender, […]]]>

BILLINGS – An army of students from Billings Central Catholic High School were on site Sunday afternoon at St. Pius X Parish in Billings to help unload and organize a truckload of Christmas trees for a fundraiser. Knights of Columbus Fund.

“You smell like the Christmas tree afterwards so it’s always nice,” said John Pender, 16, a sophomore at Central High.

MTN News / Mitch Lagge

John Pender, a sophomore at Billings Central High, interviews MTN News before unloading a semi-truck full of Christmas trees.

Christmas trees have been on sale at the church for over 40 years, said Phillip Zeeck, tree lot manager and member of Knights Council 9976. The Knights have ordered around 700 trees for sale this year, he said.

“Originally the school was doing it as a fundraiser, then it was too much work for them, so the Knights took over. We decided that this would be a way for us to fund our various charities that we support, ”said Zeeck.

“Some of them are: Family Service on the South Side, St. Vincent de Paul, we support the LaVie Pregnancy Crisis Center. There are a lot of people who come to us for help and we are almost always able to help, ”Zeeck added.

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MTN News / Mitch Lagge

Phillip Zeek, Knights of Columbus Council 9976 member and tree lot manager.

Two Knights’ Councils combine fundraising: Council 9976 in St. Pius and Council 1259 at St. Bernard Catholic Church in Billings Heights, Zeeck said. The price of trees ranges from $ 35 to $ 90, depending on the size.

Zeeck said the group normally ran out of trees by the second week of December.

“It’s always a successful fundraiser. It’s better some years than others. But there is a shortage of Christmas trees. We don’t get the trees we order, it seems. But we have a lot of trees this year, ”said Zeeck.

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MTN News / Mitch Lagge

Students at Central High School help the Knights of Columbus unload approximately 700 Christmas trees from the delivery truck.

A drought at the Christmas tree supplier in Sandpoint, Idaho meant the Billings Knights might not get their usual supply of trees, but the cargo did eventually arrive.

“They had the same drought there as we did. It was a bit more difficult. These trees don’t grow that fast when it’s dry,” Zeeck said.

Central students take a religion course, which requires 10 hours of community service per semester. Unloading trees is a quick way to save hours for some students.

Filippo Caporaso, 17, was helping to unload the truck. He is a foreign exchange student from Como, Italy, and has said he hopes to share the Italian Christmas tradition with his classmates.

“I hope I understand the American Christmas tradition better. I hope to return to Italy to share with my friends and family so that we can share the culture and tradition. But I also hope to bring my tradition here so that I can exchange culture and tradition, ”said Caporaso.

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MTN News / Mitch Lagge

Filippo Caporaso, an exchange student from Italy, speaks with MTN News before helping unload Knights of Columbus Christmas trees in Billings.

In Italy, there is a strict tradition when you go up and down your tree, Caporaso said. The tree goes up on December 8 and is cut down on January 6 and the trees are not as decorated in Italy as they are in the United States, Caporaso said.

“We still have Christmas trees. Maybe they are not as beautiful as they are here. Christmas decorations are not as important in Italy as they are here, ”Caporaso said.

For other students, this is not their first rodeo on the Christmas tree. Halle Anderson, a 15-year-old freshman from Central, said she was helping out long before she was a high school student.

“I have been helping with Christmas trees since I was little. My father is one of the Knights, so since I have been, I don’t know how old I am coming with him to at least sit in the trailer and help out there. Now that I’m older I can help deliver trees and stuff, ”Anderson said.

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MTN News / Mitch Lagge

Halle Anderson, 15, a freshman at Billings Central High, stands in front of the Christmas tree truck she is about to help unload.

Anderson said unloading the Christmas tree always marks the start of the holiday season for her.

“It’s always been so much fun. I always love coming with my dad whenever he decides to volunteer here and help and see all the families looking for their perfect Christmas tree and helping them find the perfect Christmas tree Said Anderson.

People can buy a tree Monday through Friday between 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. The lot of trees will be open on weekends from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

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MTN News / Mitch Lagge

Students at Billings Central High help put Christmas trees in their proper place for the Knights of Columbus fundraiser.

RELATED: Damn, Now There’s A Shortage Of Christmas Trees Too


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Holeton Praise for Work as Para-educator at Hoover Elementary School | Education https://adventurebase100.org/holeton-praise-for-work-as-para-educator-at-hoover-elementary-school-education/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 06:15:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/holeton-praise-for-work-as-para-educator-at-hoover-elementary-school-education/ Support local journalism Your subscription makes our report possible. {{featured_button_text}} Holeton, who started school in Council Bluffs, attended Hoover until grade three before his family moved to Glenwood. The last professor at Hoover, he had retired last year. Since then the building has been extended and renovated and the playground has been redone. “The school […]]]>

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Holeton, who started school in Council Bluffs, attended Hoover until grade three before his family moved to Glenwood. The last professor at Hoover, he had retired last year. Since then the building has been extended and renovated and the playground has been redone.

“The school has changed so much,” he says. “My kindergarten class is now the preschool wing.”

Still, being at the school where he started brings back fond memories to Holeton.

“I remember some places – playing with classmates, walking down the hall,” he said. “I loved going to school. I just remember having so many friends and loving the teachers.

It was when Holeton was in high school that he began to consider a career in teaching.

“I started working in a daycare when I was in my senior year,” he says. “I was just starting to realize that we could make a difference and help shape their lives in a positive direction. “

Holeton observed classes at Edison and Hoover before becoming a para-educator and also worked with students from Lewis and Clark. His job at Hoover is essentially part of his education.

“It was really nice to see the range of teaching styles,” he said.

Holeton, who returned to Council Bluffs in September, is hoping to secure a teaching position here and thinks he would like to teach students in grades two to five, although he wouldn’t mind going to the school either. kindergarten. He takes advantage of his time at Hoover.


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Five ways to save on your council tax https://adventurebase100.org/five-ways-to-save-on-your-council-tax/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 06:01:57 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/five-ways-to-save-on-your-council-tax/ Household budgets are under pressure as energy bills and inflation costs are set to rise, but savings could be made on your council tax. With finances already strained by rising cost of living and energy bills, housing tax increases announced in the recent budget could deal another blow to households. The Institute for Fiscal Studies […]]]>

Household budgets are under pressure as energy bills and inflation costs are set to rise, but savings could be made on your council tax.

With finances already strained by rising cost of living and energy bills, housing tax increases announced in the recent budget could deal another blow to households. The Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) has predicted that the tax could rise to as much as £ 220 ($ 296) over the next few years if more central funding is not given to the councils.

With an average bill for a D-Band property already at £ 1,898, higher bills could squeeze budgets even further. With that in mind, it’s worth seeing if there are ways to save money.

We’re taking a look at how you can check if you’re overpaying, along with some other tips to help keep costs down.

1. Challenge your group

A good way to reduce municipal tax costs is to check if your home is in the correct band and dispute that if you think it is not. According to personal finance site Money.co.uk, anyone who is in the wrong group could unwittingly pay up to 20% more each year.

James Andrews of Money.co.uk said: “The first step to reducing your municipal tax payments is to check your tax bracket on the government website. If you think your group is wrong, you can appeal.

To check your group, go here. If you’re in the wrong group, you might be able to get hundreds of pounds back.

But be sure to do your research first, as you may see housing tax go up or down.

2. Get a discount for living alone

If you are the only adult living in your accommodation, you should be eligible for a 25% discount.

Nick Drewe, money saving expert on the online rebate platform WeThrift, said: “Living alone allows you to enjoy a 25% discount on your bill, saving you hundreds of dollars per year. It will make a special difference when prices go up.

Based on the average municipal tax bill of £ 1,898 for a D-Band property, you’ll save £ 475 with the single person discount, so it’s worth talking to your local authority.

Read more: UK inflation hits decade high, making interest rate hikes inevitable

3. Students shouldn’t pay a dime

Full-time students shouldn’t have to pay housing tax.

Alastair Douglas of credit scoring specialist, TotallyMoney.com, said: “In households where everyone is a full-time student, you don’t have to pay. If you receive an invoice, request an exemption.

You can do it here.

To count as a full-time student, your course must last at least one year and involve at least 21 hours of study per week.

4. Save if you receive benefits

If you are on low income or currently receive benefits, including Crédit Universel, you may be entitled to a reduction on your municipal tax bill.

The amount by which you can reduce your bill will depend on where you live, as each municipality operates its own reduction program. It also depends on your personal situation, including your income, the number of children you have and the benefits you are applying for.

Read more: UK property prices jump amid supply crunch

5. Claiming a reduction as a caregiver

If you are a caregiver or live with a caregiver, you may be able to request a reduction. The same goes if you have a health problem or a disability, or if you live with someone who has it.

In addition, people diagnosed with a serious mental health problem are also eligible for a discount.

Watch: Why Are Home Prices Going Up?


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Graduate student leaders: only a union can deliver real change at MIT https://adventurebase100.org/graduate-student-leaders-only-a-union-can-deliver-real-change-at-mit/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 04:56:31 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/graduate-student-leaders-only-a-union-can-deliver-real-change-at-mit/ MIT graduate student leaders from GSC, BGSA, RISE campaign, and EECS call for union against institutional inaction By Willie Boag, Ki-Jana Carter, Seamus Lombardo, Caris Moses, Chelsea Onyeador, Ufuoma Ovienmhada, Jack Reid, Kara Rodby and Madeleine Sutherland November 15, 2021 As graduate student advocates, we know the needs of our community and the damage that […]]]>

MIT graduate student leaders from GSC, BGSA, RISE campaign, and EECS call for union against institutional inaction

As graduate student advocates, we know the needs of our community and the damage that occurs when student voices are not part of the conversation. We know that graduate student workers need stronger protections against harassment and discrimination, strong investments in diversity, equity and inclusion (DCI) programs, affordable housing and a living wage. . To this end, we have joined committees, boards, task forces and advisory boards, committed to positively impacting the experience of MIT graduate workers. Instead of making headway, we’ve seen the MIT administration unilaterally ignore embarrassing recommendations, reject and exploit the graduate worker-student service, and resist the changes we urgently need.

MIT’s existing advocacy channels undermine the power of graduate students

The administration affirms that the existing channels of dialogue between the student-workers graduates of MIT and the administration are sufficient, but our experience proves the contrary. As leaders of the Graduate Student Council (GSC), Black Graduate Student Association (BGSA), Reject Injustice through Student Empowerment (RISE), and DCI’s departmental efforts, we know the limits of current advocacy channels. The only way to ensure transformative change at MIT is for graduate student workers to unionize and fight for a strong contract.

Our support for MIT GSU is not a criticism of the GSC or student advocacy, but rather a criticism of the system in which they are forced to operate. The imbalance of power between the SGC and the administration forces SGC members to spend considerable energy discussing things that should be common sense. We had to explain that we could not expect our colleagues to make academic progress without knowing if they would be paid during a global pandemic, than allowing MIT housing to fall below minimum habitability requirements. Massachusetts was unacceptable, and that allowing a private company to offer rents in a new building where the cheapest rent was more than half the average allowance was absurd and violated the spirit of MIT’s 2017 agreement with Cambridge. We regularly found ourselves in meetings with administrators who were fighting for basic tenants’ rights or for guarantees of funding for individual graduate student workers – a few people doing the work of an entire union.

The MIT administration made it clear to the GSC External Affairs Council that it opposes the interests of graduate students and workers. They have lobbied directly against the GSC on several occasions: lining up with the Trump administration to claim that graduate student workers are not employees, actively advocating to deny our right to organize and fighting against the Oversight and transparency legislation protecting graduate students at both federal and state levels.

Institutional inaction hinders the defense of student interests at all levels

When the barriers to advocacy through formal / established channels such as the GSC seem insurmountable, we turned to other potential vehicles for change: department-level advocacy, working with established and respected organizations like the Black Graduate Student Association. (BGSA) and form new coalitions like RISE. However, the MIT administration has continued to respond to these attempts uncompromisingly, made possible by decentralized structures that diffuse responsibility and limit accountability.

In June 2020, in light of the national calculation triggered by the wrongful killings of black Americans and building on grievances from MIT students over racism and prejudice by the police on campus, the BGSA drafted the petition for support black lives. He quickly received over 5,000 signatures. We then participated in over 60 hours of meetings with members of the Academic Council, the Strategic Plan Steering Committee and the Public Safety Working Group. In each conversation, we spent more time rediscovering blatant systemic biases and rehashing obvious points for each BIPOC than we spent working for tangible progress. Student-workers, especially those with marginalized identities, have been communicating our needs for years, if not decades, through various avenues such as the BGSA 2015 recommendations and the multiple organized policing and welfare focus groups. Last year. The bottleneck at MIT isn’t a lack of knowledge or resources – it’s the administration’s resistance to change.

Seventeen months later, MIT still refuses to make any meaningful progress, approving only symbolic issues like making Juneteenth a feast of the Institute. Even simple improvements, like removing GRE requirements, are not implemented at the institute level. While we remain confident that the Strategic Plan Committee and the Public Safety Task Force will eventually produce plans, we remain deeply uncertain whether these guidelines will actually improve the lives of black people at MIT, or even be implemented at all. .

MIT’s institutional inaction on DCI’s goals also plagues student lawyers working for change at the departmental level. In July 2020, EECS graduate student workers submitted a petition to the EECS administration calling for the hiring of a DEI manager within six months. Department management agreed that hiring an officer in a timely manner was a priority. Sixteen months later, despite monthly consultative meetings with hiring committee officials, the students are still waiting. Originally, the EECS administration said it hoped the DCI officer would start in March 2021, but that date slipped to summer 2021 and then early fall. At the time of writing this report, no DCI manager had been hired within the EECS.

Gains from student advocacy efforts are insufficient and vulnerable

The RISE campaign used a collective, public and confrontational approach to improve the graduate student experience. Our main gain with this approach has been the guarantee of transition funding: any student-worker who wishes to emerge from an unhealthy counseling situation is now entitled to at least one semester of funding to facilitate the transition.

Despite the administration’s claims, the process of securing these victories was far from “… a perfect model for how students and administration might work together.” On the contrary, we have repeatedly witnessed the familiar tactics of co-opting the administration, the lack of transparency, and the exploitation of the power imbalance between graduate student-workers and the administration. As a result, the funding program itself fails to hold problematic advisers accountable and forces departments to fund commitments individually, resulting in unfair treatment across the Institute and causing poorly funded departments to return those funds. difficult to access. More importantly, nothing codifies this guarantee other than the words of the MIT administration – only a contract can guarantee the continuation of this program.

Regardless of which advocacy channel we use, we have found that our voices are being ignored and that the actions taken by the MIT administration to meet the needs of graduate students are inadequate at best. We have devoted large amounts of unpaid work to MIT, but the administration refuses to make substantive policy changes that would dramatically improve the lives of student workers. Ultimately, our advocacy channels – The GSC, BGSA, RISE, and individual department efforts suffer from one key limitation: they only wield the power that the MIT administration cedes to them. As advocates for graduate students, we know that the only viable path for lasting change at MIT is for graduate student workers to form a union. With our union, we will finally have a voice at the bargaining table supported by thousands of graduate student workers alongside their colleagues. With our union, we will finally have the collective power to negotiate a strong contract that reflects student priorities, codifies hard-fought victories, and ensures that we move towards better MIT.

We ask you to support us by signing your union card at mitgsu.org/sign.

We, the authors, are graduate student leaders who have served on the Graduate Student Council (GSC), the Black Graduate Student Association (BGSA), Reject Injustice through Student Empowerment (RISE), and student advocacy groups in electrical and computer engineering. (EECS), the largest department of MIT.

Madeleine Sutherland is a fifth year chemistry graduate student-worker and was the chair of the GSC for the 2020-2021 term.

Seamus Lombardo is a fourth year graduate student worker at AeroAstro and is the current co-chair of the Federal Affairs Subcommittee of the GSC External Affairs Council.

Jack Reid is a sixth year graduate student-worker in Media Arts and Sciences. Governance Working Group.

Caris Moses is a sixth year graduate student worker at EECS and is a member of the EECS CDEI Student Advisory Council and responsible for Black in EECS.

Willie Boag is a sixth year graduate student worker at EECS and is currently Chair of the Student Social Committee of CSAIL (2018, 2019, 2021), Member of the Council of Postdoctoral and Graduate Students of CSAIL (2020, 2021) and the EECS. representative at the SGC (2021).

Ufuoma Ovienmahda is a fourth year graduate student worker at AeroAstro and has been co-chair of the Black Graduate Student Association since 2019.

Chelsea Onyeador is a third-year graduate student-worker at AeroAstro and served as Co-Chair of the Black Graduate Students Association (2019-2020) and Chair of Political Action (2020-present).

Ki-Jana Carter is a fifth-year Materials Science and Engineering graduate student worker and served on the DMSE DEI Graduate Student Collaborative Working Group.

Kara Rodby is a fifth year chemical engineering graduate student-worker and led the RISE campaign and is the co-founder of Graduate Womxn in Chemical Engineering (GWiChE).

All authors are members of the MIT Graduate Student Union.


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The faculty council discusses the financial situation of the college https://adventurebase100.org/the-faculty-council-discusses-the-financial-situation-of-the-college/ https://adventurebase100.org/the-faculty-council-discusses-the-financial-situation-of-the-college/#respond Thu, 11 Nov 2021 00:01:20 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/the-faculty-council-discusses-the-financial-situation-of-the-college/ The Ithaca College faculty council met with Tim Downs, vice president of finance and administration and chief financial officer, and discussed the past, present and future financial situation of the college at its November 9 meeting. Downs spoke to the faculty board about the college’s current budget, as well as financial forecasting and strategies to […]]]>

The Ithaca College faculty council met with Tim Downs, vice president of finance and administration and chief financial officer, and discussed the past, present and future financial situation of the college at its November 9 meeting.

Downs spoke to the faculty board about the college’s current budget, as well as financial forecasting and strategies to improve the college’s finances. Acting Marshal Melanie Stein also provided a brief update on the Dean’s research in her report.

Aaron Witek, assistant professor in the Department of Musical Performance, asked Downs about the increase for both tuition fees and discount rate – how much the college earns in income after providing students with institutional financial aid. He asked if there was a way to advertise the lower cost of the college.

Downs said the college is giving each student a $ 10,000 scholarship instead of lowering tuition fees for each student. He said if the college reduced the tuition fee instead of providing the scholarship, it would enjoy financial gains at the start of the year, but still end up in the same place by the end of the year. Downs said the college discount rate has grown faster than tuition and room and board, but the return – the number of students entering the college out of the total number of students accepted – did not improve.

“We have increased discounts and seen yields drop or remain stable,” Downs said. “So this is again where we don’t see it as leverage and now we have to look at what the issues are and again there are many factors here and you know, from my point of view, the reputation in is part. “

Charis Dimaras, professor in the Department of Musical Performance, asked Downs how he felt about the role of Ithaca Forever – the five-year program strategic plan – which stipulates that 5,000 students would be the target number of enrollments for the college.

College enrollments have declined in recent years, reflecting national trends for colleges in the Northeast. According to at the Office of Institutional Analysis and Research, there are a total of 5,239 students enrolled in fall 2021. As of fall 2020, 5,354 students were enrolled in college.

The “College form, Published as part of the college curriculum prioritization process, says a key goal of the process was to align faculty size with student body size, which was based on a projected student population of 5,000.

“The projection of 5,000 enrollments for the foreseeable future is both realistic and ambitious, and reflects many factors including, but not limited to, the recognition of a declining student population nationwide. , our anticipated attrition based on our historical models and a gradual loss of market share over the past decade, ”the document states.

low noted if the college targets 5,000 students as a desired number, it would live on a razor’s edge if it dropped or fell below. He said he thought 5,000 was too precise a number and that the college should aim to be above or below 5,000 students.

“What is the perfect number for college?Said Downs. “It’s going to depend on whether we have to target to be above 5,000, or we have to aim to be below 5,000. And each is going to come up with a different set of solutions and outcomes depending on what we’re doing, but that is what we are working on… Can we reach these enrollment numbers? Can we meet these retention numbers? These are going to be important factors that, over the next year or so, we really need to look at to see if these are the right models and the right inputs that we are putting in place, and then go from there. “

In his report, Stein provided a brief update on the current research of deans at the college.

There are currently four interim deans out of the college’s five schools: Jack Powers at the Roy H. Park School of Communications, Alka Bramhandkar at the School of Business, and Ivy Walz at the School of Music. However, there will only be three searches. Stein is the dean of the Faculty of Humanities, but assumed the post of interim rector after La Jerne Cornish was appointed interim president for the 2021-2022 academic year. Claire Gleitman is the Acting Dean of the School of Humanities while Stein is the Acting Provost.

At the State of the College meeting on Oct. 5, Stein said the research committee chairs have all been appointed. Jack Bryant, associate professor and program director of the Department of Arts, Science and Media Studies, will chair the Dean’s Research of the School of Communications; Christine Bataille, Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Management, will chair the Dean’s Research of the School of Business; and Chrystyna Dail, Associate Professor in the Department of Theater Arts, and James Mick, Associate Professor in the Department of Music Education, co-chair the Dean in Research of the New Combination of music and performing arts.

At the faculty council meeting, Stein said she hoped to publish information about the deans’ search committees the week of November 8. Stein said the college would partner with WittKieffer, an executive search firm. She said the college has in partnership with the cabinet for dean research in the past.

Courtney Young, assistant professor in the Department of Theater Arts, asked if the research agency would be open to faculty members submitting names for potential deans.

Stein said this is standard practice and she is sure it will be part of the process. She said this will be part of the active phase of the research, which will take place in the spring semester. She said the first part of the research, which will take place this semester, will feature more work from members of the campus community.

“It’s about writing the leadership profile, soliciting feedback from campus on what they’re looking for in the new dean, and doing all of that,” said Stein. “This is the kind of preparation that is going to happen this semester.”


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FSU graduate student mixing passion for science and communications https://adventurebase100.org/fsu-graduate-student-mixing-passion-for-science-and-communications/ https://adventurebase100.org/fsu-graduate-student-mixing-passion-for-science-and-communications/#respond Mon, 08 Nov 2021 21:06:28 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/fsu-graduate-student-mixing-passion-for-science-and-communications/ A graduate student from Florida State University has received a prestigious scholarship designed to teach scientists how to better communicate science to the general public. Dani Davis, a graduate student in ecology, was selected to participate in ComSciCon, a scholarship sponsored by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing, […]]]>

A graduate student from Florida State University has received a prestigious scholarship designed to teach scientists how to better communicate science to the general public.

Dani Davis, a graduate student in ecology, was selected to participate in ComSciCon, a scholarship sponsored by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing, the National Association of Science Writers, and the Communicating Science Workshops.

The scholarship was part of the annual conference of the National Association of Science Writers. During the conference, Davis and 20 other scientists participated in workshops on how to better write current science articles and develop interview skills. They also attended sessions on building a successful podcast and working in the media.

“It was really a great experience,” said Davis. “The workshop made me think maybe this was something I could do to feel like I had the tools to do it professionally.”

Participants also interviewed scientists outside their field. For Davis, that meant interviewing Daniel Scheeres, professor of aerospace engineering at the University of Colorado.

“It was just a great experience talking to someone so far from the realm of ecology,” Davis said.

Davis first got a taste of science communication while working as an outdoor educator at a nature center in Georgia. As a student at FSU, she made YouTube videos explaining different principles of ecology in order to generate enthusiasm among undergraduates for the field.

She has also recently started blogging for the WFSU Green Blog.

“Environmentalists, like all scientists, can be passionate about what they do and yet be very bad communicators,” said Thomas Miller, FSU professor of biological sciences, advising Davis. “Dani Davis is remarkable because she has a unique skill in explaining ecology to the public, while making it both informative and exciting. This scholarship allows her to develop this skill as she grows as a young scientist.


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