Council student – Adventurebase100 http://adventurebase100.org/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 09:18:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://adventurebase100.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Council student – Adventurebase100 http://adventurebase100.org/ 32 32 Sheffield students set to raise £1m with ‘Donate, Don’t Waste’ scheme | New https://adventurebase100.org/sheffield-students-set-to-raise-1m-with-donate-dont-waste-scheme-new/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 09:10:02 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/sheffield-students-set-to-raise-1m-with-donate-dont-waste-scheme-new/ Sheffield students are set to raise £1million for charity this summer by donating unwanted food, furniture or clothing when they leave their accommodation at the end of term. Since 2013, Sheffield students have donated 66,071 bags of usable items to the British Heart Foundation The Donate, Don’t Waste, run by the city’s universities and Sheffield […]]]>

Sheffield students are set to raise £1million for charity this summer by donating unwanted food, furniture or clothing when they leave their accommodation at the end of term.

  • Since 2013, Sheffield students have donated 66,071 bags of usable items to the British Heart Foundation
  • The Donate, Don’t Waste, run by the city’s universities and Sheffield City Council, is also helping to minimize the environmental impact created when thousands of students leave their accommodation.
  • The University of Sheffield has many groundbreaking research projects in collaboration with and funded by the British Heart Foundation

Sheffield students are set to raise £1million for charity this summer by donating unwanted food, furniture or clothing when they leave their accommodation at the end of term.

The Donate, Don’t Waste scheme, run by the University of Sheffield, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield City Council and charity partners, aims to minimize the environmental impact created when students move house, while helping to raise vital funds for the British Heart Foundation.

Since 2013, Sheffield students have donated 66,071 bags of usable items, which equates to more than £925,000 donation value. It is hoped that this year’s donations will see that figure rise to £1 million.

Donations made by students reduce the waste produced when they move while making a positive difference in the wider community.

The University of Sheffield has many research projects in collaboration with and funded by the British Heart Foundation.

Examples of these projects include developing new ways to image the lungs, creating a new virtual tool to detect cardiac patients requiring stents, and research to uncover the mechanisms behind pulmonary arterial hypertension. ; working towards a cure.

Amanda Purkiss, University Account Manager at the British Heart Foundation, said: “We are delighted with the support the University of Sheffield provides each year through its ‘Donate, Don’t Waste’ campaign.

“With over 700 shops and stores, we rely heavily on student and staff donations for much-needed inventory. The ‘Pack for Good’ scheme encourages students and staff at universities, such as Sheffield, to donate unwanted items, such as clothes, shoes, books, DVDs, bags and small electrical appliances, at the BHF.

“This is a convenient campaign for students to easily donate favorite items at the end of term through donation banks and pop-up bins. The money raised through these donations helps the BHF fund vital research into heart and circulatory disease.

Over 9.4 tonnes of unopened canned and packaged food have also been donated by students to S6 Foodbank since 2015, equivalent to 17,465 meals. Donations also have a significant environmental impact and the total equates to saving 4,776,677 kg of CO2, compared to if the items were sent to landfill.

Andrew Woffindin, Contracts and Environment Coordinator at the University of Sheffield, works closely with charities including the British Heart Foundation.

He said: “We are very grateful for the thousands of items donated by students. The program benefits everyone, and especially in light of what is happening around the world, with more people falling into poverty, student donations are having a positive impact on the wider community.

“We ensure that no item is wasted. The British Heart Foundation does not accept quilts and bedding, but many other charities are more than happy to take them, including AID4Gambia and St Vincents De Paul, with whom the university also works. All items go to a good cause and greatly help families in the Sheffield community.

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The Bristol Press – Bristol’s Joshua Medeiros appointed to National Council https://adventurebase100.org/the-bristol-press-bristols-joshua-medeiros-appointed-to-national-council/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 16:36:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/the-bristol-press-bristols-joshua-medeiros-appointed-to-national-council/ BRISTOL – Joshua Medeiros, superintendent of the Department of Parks, Recreation, Youth and Community Services, has been elected to the National Accrediting Board for Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Allied Professions (COAPRT). COAPRT is the nation’s premier accrediting agency for higher education programs. Medeiros was recruited and then elected as a “practitioner representative”. His term will […]]]>

BRISTOL – Joshua Medeiros, superintendent of the Department of Parks, Recreation, Youth and Community Services, has been elected to the National Accrediting Board for Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Allied Professions (COAPRT).

COAPRT is the nation’s premier accrediting agency for higher education programs. Medeiros was recruited and then elected as a “practitioner representative”. His term will begin immediately to fill a vacancy on the board. Then, his first official term will begin this fall and end in 2025.

“They looked for me; someone from the council reached out and asked if I wanted to be involved,” Medeiros said. “They had heard of my involvement with the National Recreation and Park Association Board of Directors. It is an honor to be selected to join the prestigious COAPRT.”

In his role as a board member, Medeiros will assist in the review of the program’s self-assessment reports for compliance with national standards. It will also review and approve visitation reports and establish accreditation policies, procedures and standards for institutes of higher learning across the country.

“I look forward to applying both my skills as a practitioner as well as my training to ensure that colleges and universities across the country prepare and sustain future parks and recreation professionals to the highest standards of the industry,” Medeiros said.

Medeiros said he believed COAPRT contacted him because over the past few years he had worked to “put Bristol on the national map” with its programs and initiatives.

In June, Bristol Parks, Recreation, Youth and Community Services was announced as one of four finalists considered to receive the 2022 National Gold Medal Award for Excellence in Parks and Recreation Management.

According to COAPRT’s website, Accreditationcouncil.org, the council’s goal is “to advance academic quality in teaching, learning, research, and service.” It also aims to “demonstrate accountability by fostering public awareness, trust and investment”. The board encourages planning for change and improvement through quality assessment, particularly student achievement.

COAPRT protects students, families, sponsoring organizations, colleges, universities, employers, and the public by “ensuring that those enrolled in accredited programs receive a quality education.” To do this, they use a formal process for reviewing and accrediting higher education programs. Their goal is “to ensure that these programs enable people to succeed in parks, recreation, tourism, and related specialty occupations.”

“The council is really responsible for accrediting college and university parks and recreation programs,” Medeiros said. “If they are to be accredited they must meet the highest standards. I look forward to continuing to grow and learn myself and bringing what I learn back to Bristol so that translates into improvement of our programs.

Brian M. Johnson can be reached at 860-973-1806 or bjohnson@bristolpress.com.

Published in The Bristol Press, Bristol on Monday, June 27, 2022 12:30 PM. Updated: Monday, June 27, 2022 12:33 p.m.
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‘Celebrating Lewiston’ event debuts at Mike McGraw Park in Lewiston https://adventurebase100.org/celebrating-lewiston-event-debuts-at-mike-mcgraw-park-in-lewiston/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 22:35:13 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/celebrating-lewiston-event-debuts-at-mike-mcgraw-park-in-lewiston/ Somali group Dhaanto perform a traditional Somali dance Saturday at the end of the Lewiston Youth Advisory Council’s ‘Celebrating Lewiston’ event at Mike McGraw Park. From left to right, in blue, Shukri Said, Muna Ali and Halima Ahmed. In brown, Hawa Said, Najmo Ahmed and Nasro Yusuf. Andrée Kehn/Sun Journal LEWISTON — At the grand […]]]>

Somali group Dhaanto perform a traditional Somali dance Saturday at the end of the Lewiston Youth Advisory Council’s ‘Celebrating Lewiston’ event at Mike McGraw Park. From left to right, in blue, Shukri Said, Muna Ali and Halima Ahmed. In brown, Hawa Said, Najmo Ahmed and Nasro Yusuf. Andrée Kehn/Sun Journal

LEWISTON — At the grand opening of “Celebrating Lewiston” on Saturday, Lewiston City Council, the Lewiston Public Library and others greeted visitors with souvenirs and information about upcoming events at Mike McGraw Park.

Organized by the Lewiston Youth Advisory Council (LY

AC), the event highlights the efforts of young people in Lewiston to show what the city has to offer and to recognize the 10 council members who graduated from high school this year.

“We really wanted to celebrate everything Lewiston has to offer that other cities (don’t). We wanted to sum up what Lewiston is all about. (The council) said, “Let’s get some businesses together and show what Lewiston has to offer,” said Kiera Potvin, a council member since her sophomore year of high school.

“Lewiston is a diverse community for me. I will miss the diversity offered in this community and the sense of family,” said Potvin, who will be attending Hobart and William Smith colleges in the fall.

At a table adorned with brochures and frisbees emblazoned with the city logo “Lewiston, ME”, three members of the Lewiston City Council spoke highly of the work done by the LYAC in organizing the event and answering questions from attendees.

“I’m impressed at every meeting, every day,” said Linda M. Scott, City Council Member and LYAC Councilor. She listed some of the events LYAC has organized over the years: an event on food insecurity with St. Mary’s Food Pantry, an anti-bullying campaign with elementary school students, and a short film on driving while driving. drunk.

“I just sit there and listen to them. They come up with all the ideas. I gave them some story points. They think I’m a history encyclopedia for Lewiston, but I’m like, “I’m just old.” They’re pretty amazing,” Scott said.

GG Guhat sings “You’re Beautiful” at the Lewiston Youth Advisory Council’s “Celebrating Lewiston” event Saturday at Mike McGraw Park. GG Guhat is a student at Lewiston High School. Andrée Kehn/Sun Journal

According to Scott, about half of LYAC seniors graduated at the top of their class. In addition to their academics, their hometown pride is unmatched.

“What I like about them is that they are really positive. When I think about Lewiston and the city’s image, part of the problem we’ve had is ourselves, people of our generation talking badly about the city. (LYAC members) really love Lewiston. They have to help us change the paradigm,” said a council volunteer.

Auburn Savings Bank was announced as a sponsor of Mike McGraw Park when the sign was unveiled, while firefighters from the Lewiston Fire Department arrived on Engine No. 7, interacting with attendees and their children to the sound of a musical performance by GG Guhat.

“The Lewiston Youth Advisory Council is a model of student civic engagement and I am honored to be part of today’s event,” said Mayor Carl L. Sheline. “Lewiston quite possibly has the youngest average age in the state, and I’m proud of our students serving on the youth council. ”

Hannah Arsenault, left, takes a yoga class from Jossyln Jalbert during the Lewiston Youth Advisory Council’s ‘Celebrating Lewiston’ event Saturday at Mike McGraw Park. Andrée Kehn/Sun Journal


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NKU Appoints Auburn University’s Grant Garber as Vice President of Legal/General Counsel https://adventurebase100.org/nku-appoints-auburn-universitys-grant-garber-as-vice-president-of-legal-general-counsel/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 04:37:22 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/nku-appoints-auburn-universitys-grant-garber-as-vice-president-of-legal-general-counsel/ Northern Kentucky University announces that it has named Grant Garber as its next vice president for legal affairs/general counsel. Garber will join NKU on July 18. “We are delighted to have Grant Garber join NKU as the university’s next vice president for legal affairs and general counsel,” said NKU President Ashish Vaidya. “With his extensive […]]]>

Northern Kentucky University announces that it has named Grant Garber as its next vice president for legal affairs/general counsel. Garber will join NKU on July 18.

“We are delighted to have Grant Garber join NKU as the university’s next vice president for legal affairs and general counsel,” said NKU President Ashish Vaidya. “With his extensive experience in public higher education and his strong commitment to our mission, Grant will be a strategic thinking partner for the leadership team as we navigate an uncertain and complex legal and compliance landscape that challenges us. waits.”

Garber comes to NKU from Auburn University, where he has served as an Academic Advocate since 2018. Concurrently, Garber is also the Senior Advocate for Auburn University – Montgomery (AUM). In this dual role, Garber performs all legal work for AUM, a separately accredited institution run by its own management team. At Auburn, he focuses on a wide range of business issues and projects in employment and student affairs.

“NKU is a special place, with a campus community that shares a deep commitment to the success of our students and our region, and it is a true privilege to serve NKU as General Counsel,” said Garber. “I am delighted to join Dr. Vaidya and the entire faculty and staff of NKU in addressing the laudable challenges we face in higher education and in realizing our common mission.”

Prior to his tenure at Auburn University, Garber served as Associate General Counsel for Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. He began his career working for law firms in Ohio and North Carolina, where he represented utilities, universities and other institutional clients.

Garber is a graduate of Georgetown University and Duke University School of Law.

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Share your sustainability ideas and win big for your school with the Propane Council https://adventurebase100.org/share-your-sustainability-ideas-and-win-big-for-your-school-with-the-propane-council/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/share-your-sustainability-ideas-and-win-big-for-your-school-with-the-propane-council/ PERC’s “Be Like Jack” sustainability contest, organized in partnership with The Week Junior magazine, is inspired by Jack Kendricka college student from Caroline from the south who successfully petitioned his school district to purchase the state’s first propane-powered special needs school bus. Jack won PERC’s first Clean Energy Hero Award for his actions. Students aged […]]]>

PERC’s “Be Like Jack” sustainability contest, organized in partnership with The Week Junior magazine, is inspired by Jack Kendricka college student from Caroline from the south who successfully petitioned his school district to purchase the state’s first propane-powered special needs school bus. Jack won PERC’s first Clean Energy Hero Award for his actions.

Students aged 8-14 interested in entering the competition can visit theweekjunior.com/percbigideas to submit a drawing with a short written response on how they would make their school more sustainable. One winner from each age group (8-9, 10-11, 12-14) will win a $2,000 donation to their school to finance a sustainable development project of their choice.

“Jack is an inspiration to all of us, and we know there are many more kids like him who have big ideas about how to make the world a more sustainable place,” said Stephen Whaley, Director of Autogas Business Development for PERC. “By advocating for propane-powered school buses, Jack was able to significantly reduce harmful emissions for his classmates, his bus driver, and his community. Imagine what could happen if every student stood up for their sustainable idea, and we’re thrilled. to launch a cleaner future with these donations.”

Additionally, a Grand Prize winner will also be able to meet The Space Gal, Emilie Calandrelli, at a special Science Day event at their school. Emily is a MIT-engineer turned Emmy-nominated science TV host and co-executive producer of Emily’s Wonder Lab on Netflix. She is also featured as a correspondent on Netflix’s Bill Nye Saves the World and executive producer and host of FOX’s Xploration Outer Space. Emily is the author of the science chapters book series, the Ada Lace Adventures.

“These students have the power to change the world with their ideas and make their community a better place to live,” Calandrelli said. “We hope this contest inspires them to think about how they can make a difference, just like Jack did with his propane school bus.”

More than 1,000 school districts across the country have improved its sustainability by adopting propane-powered school buses, including many districts that have replaced entire fleets of diesel with clean propane. Compared to modern diesel buses, propane buses reduce harmful nitrogen oxide emissions by 96%, which is the key element in the formation of smog and ozone which can aggravate respiratory problems. Propane school buses also have the lowest total cost of ownership of any fuel, saving districts money that can be reinvested in the classroom. Learn more about propane school buses by visiting BetterOurBuses.com.

To submit an entry for the “Be Like Jack” contest or to view the official entry rules, visit theweekjunior.com/percbigideas. Entries must be submitted by July 15, 2022.

About PERC:

The Propane Education & Research Council is a non-profit organization that provides industry-leading propane safety and education programs and invests in research and development of new propane-powered technologies. PERC is operated and funded by the propane industry. For more information, visit Propane.com.

For more information:

Ingrid Bechard
Propane Education and Research Council
202-452-8975
[email protected]

Jenna Jaynes
Swanson Russell
402-437-6406
[email protected]

SOURCE Propane Education and Research Council

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KY Board of Post-Secondary Education Approves Tuition, University Programs and Trust Fund Guidelines https://adventurebase100.org/ky-board-of-post-secondary-education-approves-tuition-university-programs-and-trust-fund-guidelines/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 04:34:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/ky-board-of-post-secondary-education-approves-tuition-university-programs-and-trust-fund-guidelines/ The Council on Post-Secondary Education gave final approval to the campus proposals for tuition and compulsory fees at its meeting last week. Overall, the change in resident undergraduate tuition rates averages 1.5% system-wide, the third-lowest increase in recent history. All proposals submitted were within the tuition fee caps set by the Council last year. This […]]]>

The Council on Post-Secondary Education gave final approval to the campus proposals for tuition and compulsory fees at its meeting last week. Overall, the change in resident undergraduate tuition rates averages 1.5% system-wide, the third-lowest increase in recent history.

All proposals submitted were within the tuition fee caps set by the Council last year. This decision allowed universities to increase tuition fees by up to 3% over two years, but no more than 2% per year. Kentucky Community and Technical College System campuses were limited to a maximum increase of $5 per credit hour over two years and a maximum increase of $3 per credit hour in one year.

“College affordability is a priority for both CPE and our colleges and universities,” said CPE President Aaron Thompson. “These historically low tuition increases are one of many strategies we are employing to ensure that cost is not a barrier to earning a degree or credential in Kentucky.”

For undergraduate resident students, rate changes include:

• Eastern Kentucky University—1%
• Kentucky State University—1.8%
• Morehead State University—1.1%
• Murray State University: 1.9%
• University of Kentucky—2%
• University of Louisville—1.2%
• Western Kentucky University — 1.1%

Fees for Northern Kentucky University and KCTCS were approved in April.

In other matters, the Council approved three new academic programs.

• University of Kentucky, Bachelor of Science in Leadership for Community Education and Human Learning: This 120 credit hour program is designed to prepare students to lead educational programs in community organizations. The program is aimed at students who desire a professional career in the education of children and/or adults outside the traditional school structure. It does not lead to teacher certification.

• University of Louisville, Master of Arts in Applied Philosophy: Students will complete this 33 credit hour program with three semesters of full-time coursework and a fourth semester of capstone independent study. The program trains students in ethical leadership focused on practical issues, health care ethics, and the non-academic labor market.

• University of Northern KentuckyMaster of Arts in Instructional Leadership: This 30 credit hour program will train teachers for administrative positions as elementary, middle, and secondary school principals as well as P-12 teaching supervisors and leads to principal certification in Kentucky.

For KCTCS, the Board heard that staff had approved six Associate of Applied Science degrees since January, in accordance with the program approval process. At Maysville Community and Technical College, they endorsed degrees in social services, aviation maintenance technology, health science technology, and education. At Southcentral Kentucky Community and Technical College, they approved a medical laboratory technician degree. At Hopkinsville Community and Technical College, they approved a Computerized Manufacturing and Machining degree.

Asset Preservation Pool Guidelines

In another action, the Board approved the guidelines for the 2022-24 Asset Preservation Pool that were enacted in the 2022-24 State Budget and delegated authority to staff to approve the investment projects financed by the pool.

This $683.5 million pool funds asset preservation, renovation and maintenance projects for education and general facilities at public post-secondary institutions in Kentucky.

The budget also authorized an additional $16.5 million for a stand-alone asset preservation project at KCTCS. In total, the General Assembly authorized $700 million for asset preservation to meet an anticipated collective need of $7.3 billion.

Campuses will be required to provide matching funds. Research institute projects will be matched at 30 cents for every state dollar, while the match for comprehensive universities and KCTCS will be 15 cents for every state dollar.

In addition to matching requirements, the guidelines include use of funds, reimbursement process, project identification, and certification of expenditures.

money for brains

Council approved guidelines for Bucks for Brains, an endowment matching program designed to bring new funds from external sources to public universities and support efforts to increase endowments for science, technology, engineering, math initiatives and health.

The General Assembly authorized $40 million in government bond funds for the program. Of the total amount, $30 million has been earmarked for the Research Challenge Trust Fund. As required by law, two-thirds, or $20 million, will go to the UK, and the remaining third, $10 million, will go to the UofL.

The remaining $10 million from the program was earmarked for the Comprehensive University Excellence Trust Fund. These funds will be distributed among comprehensive universities based on each institution’s share of the total general fund for the sector, excluding debt service and specialized non-teaching programs.

Universities are required to match state funds dollar for dollar.

Workforce Development Trust Fund

The Board approved the guidelines for the $2.25 million allocated to the Workforce Development Trust Fund by the General Assembly. The purpose of the fund is to increase the capacity to generate credentials in academic disciplines that address labor shortages in five sectors: healthcare, advanced manufacturing, transportation and logistics. , business services and information technology, as well as construction and trades.

In 2020-21, these industries had projected annual job application numbers that exceeded the number of KCTCS graduates.

As part of other financial measures, the Board approved two asset preservation projects for KCTCS: mechanical equipment and upgrades at Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College for a total of $2 million, and a replacement of the $1.5 million roof for the Glema Mahr Arts Center at Madisonville Community College.

Kentucky State University’s request for $5.5 million from its $23 million Special Appropriation for 2021-22 was also approved to fill the current year’s budget shortfall.

In other cases, Franklin County Executive Judge Huston Wells swore in three new council members: Jacob L. Brown of Louisville, Connie D. Smith of Bowling Green and Faith Kemper of Ft. Wright.

In addition, the Council:

• Approved staff recommendation to retain Regulation 13 KAR 2:045 in its current form. The regulations specify residency status for the purposes of admission and tuition assessment.

• Approved the Council Agency’s 2022-23 budget.

• Approved resolutions to thank outgoing Board members Carol Wright and Vidya Ravichandran for their service to the Board.

• Appointed Maira Gomez to the Equal Opportunity Commission.

• Received a report from Board Chair Aaron Thompson, which included updates on Kentucky State University’s management improvement plan.

Heard the reports of the Academic Strategic Initiatives Committee and the Equal Opportunity Committee as well as the annual Campus Diversity, Equity and Inclusion assessment report. Good news from the campuses was also presented.

Kentucky Council on Post-Secondary Education

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GROWING ENROLLMENT: Percentage of local high school students heading to college hits lowest level in 13 years https://adventurebase100.org/growing-enrollment-percentage-of-local-high-school-students-heading-to-college-hits-lowest-level-in-13-years/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 06:08:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/growing-enrollment-percentage-of-local-high-school-students-heading-to-college-hits-lowest-level-in-13-years/ Mike Wolanin | Members of the Class of 2022 Republic of Columbus North participate in the procession for their commencement ceremony at Columbus North High School in Columbus, Ind., on Saturday, May 28, 2022. The percentage of Bartholomew County high school students heading to college or pursuing some form of post-secondary education after graduation has […]]]>

The percentage of Bartholomew County high school students heading to college or pursuing some form of post-secondary education after graduation has fallen to its lowest level in 13 years, according to new figures from the state.

According to figures recently released by the Indiana Commission for Higher Education, only 55.4% of Bartholomew County’s high school class of 2020 – the first to graduate during the pandemic – enrolled in university or post-secondary program within one year of graduation.

This is the lowest percentage on record since 2008 and the third straight year of decline in the percentage of Bartholomew County high school graduates enrolling in post-secondary education, the data shows.

Nearly 72% of Bartholomew County’s 2017 high school class enrolled in a post-secondary program within one year of graduation. But that figure fell to 65% for the Class of 2018 and 57.3% for the Class of 2019 – the two classes immediately before the coronavirus pandemic.

National decline

Officials say the local decline mirrors trends seen statewide and nationwide, which they attribute in large part to the costs of higher education and — in 2020 — the pandemic.

The Strada Education Network released new nationwide figures on Wednesday that suggest more than a million fewer students enrolled in college this spring compared to spring 2020 – the fifth straight semester of declining enrollment.

Community colleges were the hardest hit, accounting for nearly two-thirds of the overall drop in enrollment. In addition, requests for federal financial assistance are down almost 9% compared to last year.

In Indiana, 53.4% ​​of the 2020 high school class enrolled in some sort of post-secondary education program within a year of graduation — the sixth straight year of declines and declines by compared to 64.8% among the class of 2015, according to state figures.

“This is a national trend that has been going on for many years,” said John Burnett, president and CEO of the Community Education Coalition, a Columbus-based partnership of education, business and community leaders. , focused on aligning and integrating learning from the region. with economic growth and a better quality of life. “…In terms of enrollment from high school to post-secondary education, things are on the decline across the country.”

Why the decline?

Local officials said many factors could be behind the decrease.

Most notably, in 2020, the coronavirus pandemic has disrupted high schools and colleges across the country. The high school class of 2020 completed its final semester of high school remotely, and many colleges either did not restart in the fall or operated entirely online or in limited capacity, potentially driving more students to take a year off.

Additionally, the cost of higher education, the prospect of student loan debt, as well as an academic shift of not pushing every student into college in recent years may also play a role in lower percentages of local students enrolling in university. , said Jim Roberts, superintendent of Bartholomew Consolidated School Corp.

“Getting some form of college education is always very important, in our opinion — an associate’s degree, a bachelor’s degree, whatever it is,” Roberts said. “However, we also want students to take advantage of opportunities to train while in high school, which could prepare them for employment immediately after high school. What’s interesting with this is that the best work we do to prepare a student for something to do immediately after high school, it could lower the percentage of students who go to college within the year because they have chosen to move forward and take advantage of this opportunity.

One example, Roberts said, is a welding certificate students can earn while in high school that leads them to jobs after graduation that pay “a decent amount of money.” The vast majority of Bartholomew County high school students take at least one technical education course.

“There was a time, it seemed, where it was, ‘Push the kids into college and let it be the thing,'” Roberts said. “And for a lot of kids that just wasn’t the thing to do, and people were spending a lot of money on it and then didn’t finish school and left school without a degree, spending a lot of money on it. money and had student loan debt. And so as we strive to have less student loan debt and stuff, what are the different steps our kids can take to get the things they need to be successful ?”

What can be done?

However, local officials say they are optimistic despite the downward trend, pointing to the resources in place in the community, including the Columbus Airpark Campus.

Burnett, for her part, said many local resources “bode well for Columbus,” pointing to a new set of services that should soon be available at the Columbus Learning Center.

The new set of services will be offered in a new space at the Columbus Learning Center called “The Bridge,” which, according to a statement from the Southeast Indiana Economic Opportunities through Education (EcO) network, will be a connecting hub for services shared by Ivy Tech, IUPUC and Purdue Polytechnic.

The bridge will include a welcoming space where “navigators” welcome and assist visitors, a free snack bar, career services offices for the three schools, six collaborative meeting rooms, a small conference room that can be reserved “ by anyone on campus or beyond,” a nursing mother’s room, Youth Development Council staff offices, and CEC staff offices.

“Imagine a year from now a student will know…here’s a place I can go for help, help me think about how I’m going to help myself, connect at work while I go to school,” Burnett said. .

Overall, Burnett said an important factor in encouraging enrollment in post-secondary education is “to keep getting better and better at helping students and their families understand the really vital connection between the ‘learning and economic opportunities’.

Roberts, for his part, said he doesn’t “feel concerned at this time” about the local decline.

“We want to continue to increase people’s post-secondary education,” Roberts said, so there will be opportunities in adulthood to get more education, to get an associate’s degree, to get something else to give them more opportunities. , this potential to earn more money as they advance.

“I think we’re just starting to see a different picture with kids and families and choices, and I don’t see that as necessarily bad,” Roberts said.

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CUSD update: CHS library makeover, 2022-2023 calendar, teachers and students rewarded for arts and languages ​​of the world https://adventurebase100.org/cusd-update-chs-library-makeover-2022-2023-calendar-teachers-and-students-rewarded-for-arts-and-languages-of-the-world/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 03:28:27 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/cusd-update-chs-library-makeover-2022-2023-calendar-teachers-and-students-rewarded-for-arts-and-languages-of-the-world/ School board administrators from the Coronado Unified School District met Thursday, June 9 at district offices where the board approved the 2022-2023 school calendar, approved the expanded learning opportunities program plan, and approved the contract for the renovation of the CHS library. But not before a few moments of celebration. The CHS band entertained community […]]]>

School board administrators from the Coronado Unified School District met Thursday, June 9 at district offices where the board approved the 2022-2023 school calendar, approved the expanded learning opportunities program plan, and approved the contract for the renovation of the CHS library. But not before a few moments of celebration.

The CHS band entertained community members with a medley of music.

The advanced students of the CHS group, led by Matt Heinecke, presented the room with a collection of Beatles songs from the Cirque de Soleil musical, Love, as well as 1920s standards by Duke Ellington.

The board recognized recipients of the Arts Empower Ovation Awards, which were created by the San Diego County Board of Education to ensure that every child has access to arts education. The “Arts Empower Creative Leader” prize was awarded to four people: Cyndi Fuhrmann, teacher of the VAPA Village; Laura Hill, CHS art professor; Linda Kullmann, performing arts teacher at CMS, Village and Strand; as well as Kris McClung, founder of the Coronado School of the Arts. Karrie Jackson, art teacher at Coronado High School and Shane Schmeichel, director of special programs at CUSD, both received the “Artful Visionary” award.

The Arts Empower Ovation Awards recognize teachers for their role in teaching the visual and performing arts.

In addition, 47 students received the California State Biliteracy Seal for excelling in languages, from Filipino and Gaulish to French and Spanish. Retired Director of Learning Claudia Gallant said while working with the district in 2015-16, the Bi-Literacy Seal was a new but very promising initiative.

The Biliteracy State Seal recognizes students who have achieved a high level of proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing in one or more languages ​​in addition to English.

“[Biliteracy] was important to me and our district as a measure of academic achievement, as a 21st skill of the century and as a life skill,” said Gallant. “There’s nothing like being able to converse with people in their own language. It builds bridges, and I think our world really needs it.

The CHS women’s lacrosse team was also recognized for their CIF Championship, beating Bishop’s in the final game.

The CHS women’s lacrosse team was recognized for their victory at the CIF.

In comments from board members, trustee Whitney Antrim said CUSD’s legacy is a place where all students learn and grow. She congratulated the CUSD students for their successes over the past few years.

“I want to thank every student at CUSD for their courage over the past two years, for their resilience. They are outstanding,” Antrim said. “Everywhere I go at CUSD, I see children grounded in their truths, led by incredible educators. Who they are is not up for debate.

Administrator Esther Valdes-Clayton asked for a moment of pause and reflection to remember the victims of the Uvalde school shooting. On a related note, Superintendent Karl Mueller said the district will hold summer interagency training to strengthen school facilities and create safe and secure learning environments. The trainings, which will focus on site safety plans, will take place on school campuses with the Coronado Police Department and the Coronado Fire Department. The work also includes strategic camera placement and implementing Coronado Police Department safety recommendations, according to Mueller.

“It is important that the partnership continues to grow stronger and that we all work collectively to prioritize the physical and emotional safety of our students,” Mueller said.

Mueller also shared that he attended “Laramie Project: Ten Years Later,” a CoSA theater production that chronicled the rebuilding of a community in Wyoming after the murder of a gay college student. He said it was important for the community to remember that in 2011, when the CHS staged a performance of The Laramie Project, the production drew protesters from the Westboro Baptist Church. But the Coronado Council of Churches has lined up to step in and support the students and the production.

“The Coronado Council of Churches came to this performance in solidarity and stood up in support of our students,” Mueller said. “It was a very special and powerful moment.”

Regarding academic recovery, Mueller said he was happy to share that the summer school was meant to serve all students who were looking for remedial measures. The summer school will be free and will focus on the areas of math, language arts and biology, according to Mueller.

Several community members spoke, including school board candidate Scot Youngblood. He shared data from a recent Harvard study that demonstrated the negative consequences of distance learning on the education of students, especially those who are economically disadvantaged.

Laura Wilkinson, resident and mother of two, said she was concerned about the economic ramifications of bowing to community members who seek to impose their values ​​and change Coronado schools.

“I want to implore you to ignore those who want to change Coronado schools, which are already the best performing,” Wilkinson said.

She said if people are concerned about equity, diversity and inclusion, they should look no further than over the US Navy fence. Wilkinson quoted a Navy document that said, “As Marines – uniform and civilian, active and reserve – we cannot tolerate any form of discrimination and must engage in open and honest conversations with each other and take measures “.

“If it’s good enough for the US Navy, it’s good enough for CUSD schools,” Wilkinson said.

In Board Reports, Senior Graduate Declan Dineen presented his final report as President of the SBA. He thanked the board for the privilege and shared that he would attend Colby College in Waterville, Maine, most likely studying economics. He introduced the new SBA President, Luke Johnson, who would take over next year. He said he couldn’t imagine a better equipped person for the job.

The board voted to accept the annual audit for the year ending June 30e, 2021, and also approved the Federal CUSD LCAP Addendum Annual Update. Trustees also voted to approve the 2021 CUSD Expanded Learning Opportunities Program Plan, which will provide scholarships to CUSD families for child care, as well as before and after school tutoring for CMS students. and CHS.

The board also approved the tentative agreement between CUSD and its employee organizations, the Association of Coronado Teachers (ACT) and the California School Employees Association (CSEA). Highlights of the deal include an 11% pay raise for the ACT and CSEA, according to Assistant District Attorney Donnie Salamanca.

“We’re one of the few school districts in the county that fixed this early in the game,” Salamanca said. “I think it’s a testament to the trust and collaboration between the district and the employee groups.”

In addition, the board voted to approve a contract for the renovation of the CHS library. The upgrades are expected to be complete by the start of the 2022-23 school year, according to Mueller, and will ultimately transform the space. Updates include new charging stations, places where students can zoom in for a class at Southwestern College, new flooring, new paint, LED lighting, study rooms, collaboration spaces and Moreover.

Finally, the board approved the adoption of new AP Chemistry textbooks at CHS and approved the 2022-2023 school calendar.

The next regular meeting of the Board of Directors will take place on June 23.

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Biden’s Education Department Launches Parent Council to Strengthen School-Family Relationships https://adventurebase100.org/bidens-education-department-launches-parent-council-to-strengthen-school-family-relationships/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 12:44:12 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/bidens-education-department-launches-parent-council-to-strengthen-school-family-relationships/ NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles! FIRST ON FOX: The U.S. Department of Education launched the National Parent and Family Engagement Council on Tuesday to ensure parents can “constructively participate in their children’s education” and facilitate “strong and effective relationships.” between schools and families. The council will be made up of parent, family […]]]>

NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

FIRST ON FOX: The U.S. Department of Education launched the National Parent and Family Engagement Council on Tuesday to ensure parents can “constructively participate in their children’s education” and facilitate “strong and effective relationships.” between schools and families.

The council will be made up of parent, family or carer representatives from national organizations who will work with the Department of Education to identify “constructive ways” to help families engage locally.

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“Parents are a child’s first teachers, and no one is better equipped to work with schools and educators to identify what students need to recover,” Education Secretary Miguel Cardona said. . “The National Parent and Family Engagement Council will serve as an important link between families, caregivers, education advocates and their school communities.”

FILE: Education Secretary Miguel Cardona speaks during the National and State Teachers of the Year 2022 event in the East Room of the White House in Washington, April 27, 2022.
(AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Cardona said the council will also help “foster a collaborative environment where we can work together to best serve the interests of students and ensure they have the academic and mental health support they need to recover from the pandemic and thrive in the future”.

ILLINOIS SCHOOL DISTRICT UNVEILS CURRICULUM TEACHING PRESCHOOLERS ABOUT SEXUAL ORIENTATION AND GENDER IDENTITY

The Ministry of Education said the council will be a “channel for parents and families to participate constructively in the education of their children by helping them understand the rights available to them”, as well as creating a “feedback loop” with schools to discuss how COVID-19 relief funds and the U.S. bailout plan are being deployed to meet student needs and identify summer learning and enrichment opportunities for children in their communities.

12 year old girl wearing a reusable protective mask in class while working on schoolwork at her desk.

12 year old girl wearing a reusable protective mask in class while working on schoolwork at her desk.

MISSOURI TEACHERS CAN HIDE PRIVATE CONVERSATIONS WITH STUDENTS FROM PARENTS, POLICY SAYS IN DOZENS OF SCHOOLS

Department of Education officials said the organization’s representatives “will reflect the diversity of the education system, including but not limited to the families of students in public schools, charter schools, schools private and school at home”.

NJ BOARD OF EDUCATION REFUSES TO REVIEW CONTROVERSIAL SEX EDUCATION CURRICULUM FOR YOUNG STUDENTS

For months, parents across the country have been sounding the alarm over the lack of respect for parental rights in the classroom, amid decisions made by school boards regarding the COVID-19 pandemic.

Parents participated in school board meetings in their communities, protesting mask and vaccine mandates for children in schools. Parents also protested and demanded more feedback regarding in-person or remote learning for their children during COVID-19 spikes. And they protested school board decisions on some classroom programs, like critical race theory and the controversial sex curriculum for young students.

Virginia school board meeting on mask policies heats up.

Virginia school board meeting on mask policies heats up.
(WTKR)

“Parents provide a critical perspective and they should always have a seat at the table whenever decisions are made that impact their children. And that is more important than ever in the effort to help students recover. of the COVID-19 pandemic,” Anna King, said the president of the National Parent Teacher Association (PTA). “The National PTA commends the Department of Education for launching the National Parent and Family Engagement Council and providing a channel for parents’ voices to be heard and acted upon.”

MOM SUES SCHOOL DISTRICT FOR IGNORING GENDER FAITH, ETHNIC CURRICULUM CALLS ON SCHOOLS TO WORK WITH PARENTS

King added: “This is critical to ensuring that students’ needs are met as they emerge from the pandemic and that every child has everything they need to make their potential a reality.”

Classroom with empty wooden desks.  (Stock)

Classroom with empty wooden desks. (Stock)
(Stock)

Vito Borrello, executive director of the National Association for Family, School and Community Engagement, applauded the creation of the council, saying it “offers the opportunity to bring together diverse voices of parents to inform Department policies and programs, while also serving as a dissemination vehicle to engage families across the country in equitable education policy.

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The council at this point includes the Council of Attorneys and Parents Advocates, Fathers Incorporated; United Generations; Daughters, Inc.; League of United Latin American Citizens; mocha mums; National Association for Family, School and Community Engagement; National Action Network; National Association of Military Families; National Association of Parents of Students, National Union of Parents; The National Center for Parent Leadership, Advocacy, and Community Empowerment, United Parent Leaders Action Network; and UnidosUS.

Officials said the council would meet in the coming weeks to discuss how best to engage “constructively” with schools.

“The Department and Council will hold local listening sessions with parents, families, principals, educators and members of the school community to better understand the needs of students at the start of the 2022-23 school year. “said the Department of Education.

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IP@K students reap the benefits of hands-on learning – Bundaberg Now https://adventurebase100.org/ipk-students-reap-the-benefits-of-hands-on-learning-bundaberg-now/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/ipk-students-reap-the-benefits-of-hands-on-learning-bundaberg-now/ Kepnock students in the IP@K program engage in hands-on learning with local businesses. Students involved in the Integrated Pathways at Kepnock (IP@K) program reap the benefits of one-on-one learning with local businesses and producers. The inaugural program was launched in April with 10 participating students from year 8 registered to participate in one day per […]]]>
Kepnock students in the IP@K program engage in hands-on learning with local businesses.

Students involved in the Integrated Pathways at Kepnock (IP@K) program reap the benefits of one-on-one learning with local businesses and producers.

The inaugural program was launched in April with 10 participating students from year 8 registered to participate in one day per week of IP@K courses on a 12-week roster.

The aim is to give disengaged young people an alternative route to education, with interactive learning with industry mentors.

Kepnock High School’s eighth grade coordinator, Danni Hibbert, said the program was halfway through and was already proving popular with those involved.

“The IP@K pilot project has been met with great enthusiasm by participating students and industry mentors,” she said.

“The industry participants showed the students all the different aspects of farming, from agronomy to sustainability to technological advancements.

“Feedback from students involved in the pilot has been overwhelmingly positive and we have also been contacted by many students and their families who would like to be involved with IP@K in the future.”

Danni said the program teaches knowledge, skills and confidence through hands-on learning in authentic settings with an array of industry leaders on board.

“Grade 8 students who met with agriculture industry representatives from Greensill Farming, Peirson Farms, Regional Drone Solutions, Macadamias Australia and Macadamia Farm Management,” she said.

“The final weeks of the pilot project will see students prepare healthy meals using local produce before embarking on food production in the hospitality industry.”

IP@K Kepnock
Students discovering drone technology as part of IP@K.

Benefits for IP@K students and industry leaders

Danni said not only are the students loving their new learning environment, but the statistics are also showing positive results.

“Since the implementation of the IP@K program, there has been a measured 90% improvement in student behavior,” she said.

“Students who didn’t know each other have now connected and said that IP@K made them feel connected to something bigger.

“We saw great improvements in students’ self-confidence and their ability to positively engage with the participating industry.”

Danni said the IP@K program was a community initiative and local businesses were integral to the success of the pilot project.

“We have been very touched by the support from the Bundaberg community,” she said.

“As IP@K is an integrated program, we plan to integrate hospitality, tourism and many other industries in the future.

“Overall, IP@K has been a rewarding, proactive and community-driven success!”

IP@K is a joint initiative of the Bundaberg Regional Council, Kepnock State High School and industry mentors.

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