Council student – Adventurebase100 http://adventurebase100.org/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 01:31:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://adventurebase100.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Council student – Adventurebase100 http://adventurebase100.org/ 32 32 Board Notes: Campus and Community Recreation, Sports and Food Bank give annual presentations https://adventurebase100.org/board-notes-campus-and-community-recreation-sports-and-food-bank-give-annual-presentations/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 21:40:54 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/board-notes-campus-and-community-recreation-sports-and-food-bank-give-annual-presentations/ “Council Notes” is The Gateway’s ongoing series of recaps of notable items from student council meetings. At the November 15 student council meeting, Campus and Community Recreation (CCR) and Golden Bears and Pandas Athletics (Athletics) presented the Athletics and Recreation fees. The Campus Food Bank (CFB) made its annual presentation to the board, and the […]]]>

“Council Notes” is The Gateway’s ongoing series of recaps of notable items from student council meetings.


At the November 15 student council meeting, Campus and Community Recreation (CCR) and Golden Bears and Pandas Athletics (Athletics) presented the Athletics and Recreation fees. The Campus Food Bank (CFB) made its annual presentation to the board, and the Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation Student Society (KSRSS) presented a proposed faculty association membership fee (FAMF).

Campus and Community Recreation Presents Annual Update

CCR Director Cheryl Harvardt and Associate Director of Athletics Vang Ioannides presented the Athletics and Recreation fees to the board.

The Athletics and Recreation Fee is a Mandatory Non-Instructional Fee (MNIF) for on-campus students. According to Harvardt, the fees are related to the management of sports and recreation facilities and the aquatics program. The CCR receives a total of $6.4 million from tuition, which is then split equally between athletics and the CCR on an annual basis.

Provided

Harvardt explained CCR’s major costs, which include institution staff salaries and benefits, student staff salaries, operating costs, capital repairs and replacements, and capital purchases such as treadmills and basketballs.

According to the presentation, more than 250 students are employed annually for recreation programs and facilities. $1,000,000 is dedicated to student staff salaries.

Harvardt provided current statistics from September 1, 2022 to October 31, 2022; there were 273,000 locker room visits and 135,000 Fitness and Lifestyle Center visits during that time.

“We can see that the students are really interested in participating in what we do and using the facilities to the fullest,” Harwardt concluded.

Golden Bears and Pandas Athletics presents to the board

Ioannides has featured on Golden Bears and Pandas Athletics, which includes 24 teams and over 500 student-athletes across all faculties on campus.

According to Ioannides, Athletics engages in community support development programs and 6,500 Athletics alumni who “provide financial assistance.”

Provided

Athletics also raises funds to provide financial assistance to student-athletes, and it provides outreach services to the community.

“The recruitment, retention and support of student-athletes is important,” said Ioannides.

Campus Food Bank Director Gives Annual Presentation

BFC Executive Director Erin O’Neil provided the Board with an annual update.

CFB is funded by a dedicated fee unit (DFU), grants from the GSA, grants from private and public organizations, and private fundraising, according to O’Neil. She added that BFC “does not currently receive any money directly from the university.”

CFB offers six different programs, which anyone with a OneCard can participate in.

Their main program, O’Neil says, is the Food Hamper program. Prior to November 7, customers collected food baskets every two weeks. Now CFB has implemented a grocery store model to replace the Food Hamper program – this way customers can choose their own produce.

“Currently we are at around 700 baskets per month, and that will change slightly this month as we have moved to a grocery store model, so there will be visits [counted] instead,” O’Neil said.

Other programs include free breakfasts, cooking workshops, a grocery bus, and the WECAN Food Basket Society. The WECAN Food Basket Society is a non-profit organization that buys meat and produce in bulk, and customers have a monthly selection of produce.

Future plans for CFB include snack stations, expanding the breakfast and bus program at Campus Saint-Jean, creating a 24/7 outdoor food pantry, exploring additional space options and an increased focus on food education.

BFC food purchases increased to $10,000 a month says general manager

During question period, UASU President Abner Monteiro asked O’Neil how the Student Union could help BFC “address the problem of food insecurity,” while working with the BFC strategic plan.

“I don’t want our interactions with students to be primarily about fundraising from individuals and students. That’s something I’d like to avoid, if possible,” O’Neil replied.

“We are really trying to set ourselves up to do advocacy work. We just don’t have the answers for [what the] real and achievable policy changes [are] it could improve the food insecurity situation on campus,” she added.

Asked about BFC’s finances by Haruun Ali, an arts adviser, O’Neil said the increase in food purchases had been “sharp”.

“The purchase of food has gone from $20,000 last year to about $10,000 a month this year,” she said. “That’s where I have some concerns, and whether we’re going to be able to meet that need through increased fundraising.”

The student association of kinesiology presents the FAMF creation proposal

Olivia Harris, vice president of finance for the Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation Student Society (KSRSS) presented her proposal for creating FAMF to the board.

KSRSS provides academic and social services to students throughout their degree. According to Harris, this has been difficult to do because the society has received less money from the Kinesiology, Sports and Recreation faculty.

“Right now we get less money for teachers than we used to,” Harris said. “The faculty used to fund our events directly through the dean’s office, and they don’t give us the same amount of funding that we used to receive due to their own budget crisis. »

The proposed fee is $3 per student for each fall and winter term, and the fee would be paid only by on-campus students. The FAMF would have a four-year term, with fee collection beginning in September 2023 and ending in September 2027.

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Students prepare for the Michigan game with a cheer rally like no other https://adventurebase100.org/students-prepare-for-the-michigan-game-with-a-cheer-rally-like-no-other/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/students-prepare-for-the-michigan-game-with-a-cheer-rally-like-no-other/ Ohio State University students prepare for the showdown against the University of Michigan with the Rivalry Rally at the Ohio Union. The Student-Alumni Council revived the traditional prep rally last year, drawing more than 900 students to the Browning Amphitheater to kick off Rivalry Week. Work with other student organizations Ohio States, Inc.. and Block […]]]>

Ohio State University students prepare for the showdown against the University of Michigan with the Rivalry Rally at the Ohio Union.

The Student-Alumni Council revived the traditional prep rally last year, drawing more than 900 students to the Browning Amphitheater to kick off Rivalry Week. Work with other student organizations Ohio States, Inc.. and Block O, they hope to make the Rivalry Rally a bigger event this year. The Rivalry Rally will take place at 7 p.m. on November 21 in the Archie Griffin Ballroom.

Student-Alumni Council program coordinators Anna Bokovoy, a third-year human development and family science major, and Sophia Lorenzetti, a fourth-year health sciences major, organized the rally this year.

“As a child, we used to meet with other elders for the [Michigan] game, and I thought how cool it would be to bring that spirit to students,” Lorenzetti said.

Bokovoy, on the other hand, was raised in a Michigan home and experienced what rivalry means across the border.

“It’s been fun charting my own path at Ohio State and learning all the traditions from both sides of the rivalry,” she said.

Lorenzetti and Bokovoy love the rich traditions of Ohio State and wanted to create an event to connect more students to what it means to be a Buckeye.

“After COVID and last year’s loss, it’s important to bring back the excitement surrounding THE game,” Bokovoy said.

The Rivalry Rally will feature a visit from members of the football team. There will be performances from the varsity club dance team, marching band, varsity cheer squad, Brutus, and special guests who have personal experience with That Team Up North.

The first 500 students to arrive at the event will receive a free Ohio State beanie, as well as other giveaways and raffle items from various student organizations.

The event is a chance for students to “get together and make the buzz,” Lorenzetti said. Beyond that, the rally is a time to celebrate being a Buckeye and counting down the days until the biggest game of the season.

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A mother who fears for her son is rejected by the law of open transfer https://adventurebase100.org/a-mother-who-fears-for-her-son-is-rejected-by-the-law-of-open-transfer/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 15:39:38 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/a-mother-who-fears-for-her-son-is-rejected-by-the-law-of-open-transfer/ Despite expressing fear for her son’s future if he remains a student in the Tulsa Public School District, a mother was unable to secure an open transfer to the Jenks District, who claims that there is a lack of capacity for young people. Maria Morales appealed Jenks’ decision to the State Board of Education at […]]]>

Despite expressing fear for her son’s future if he remains a student in the Tulsa Public School District, a mother was unable to secure an open transfer to the Jenks District, who claims that there is a lack of capacity for young people.

Maria Morales appealed Jenks’ decision to the State Board of Education at the group’s meeting in November, only to find that state law does not allow the board to question how local districts determine capacity, which led the board to reject the mother’s plea.

Visibly emotional, Morales choked up and couldn’t speak for an entire minute before addressing the board.

“Last year was pretty tough for our family,” Morales said. “My son had many, many problems at school.”

Morales said she wasn’t sure the issues arose because Tulsa Public Schools were “understaffed” and “couldn’t resolve” the situation or lacked sufficient staff to monitor “students while time”.

“There’s a time as a parent where you just want to move on and move on…” Morales said. “I was afraid every afternoon that someone would come and get him (to) tell him: ‘Everything was fine?’ and listen to something else (that happened).

Council members said the documents associated with Morales’ appeal, which have not been released publicly, are troubling.

“I appreciate your comments and your presence here,” said state education board member Sarah Lepak. “I really didn’t know any of the circumstances until I read these documents, but I’m worried.”

The 2021 law that expanded the ability for families to apply for open transfers so their children could attend other public school districts resulted in a significant increase in transfer requests.

But the data made public also indicates that the process continues to disproportionately exclude many students currently stuck in Oklahoma’s worst-performing schools, like Morales’s son, because neighboring suburban districts deny admission. .

According to the Oklahoma State Department of Education (OSDE), 10,924 transfer requests were made between January 1 and August 15, 2022. This compares to just 1,221 requests in 2021, before the open transfer expansion, and 391 transfer requests. in 2020.

But many requests are still denied. A total of more than 2,500 transfer requests had not been approved at the time of OSDE’s report. And many students facing denial appear to be trying to leave Oklahoma’s urban districts for nearby suburban schools.

KOSU reported that the denials were “concentrated in suburban and exurban areas around Oklahoma City and Tulsa.” Between July and mid-August, KOSU reported that about half of denials were from just 10 districts due to reported capacity issues: Midwest City-Del City, Moore, Jenks, Tulsa Union, Collinsville, Edmond, Choctaw- Nicoma Park, Bethel, Broken Arrow and Piedmont.

Under the law, districts can declare that they are short of space to accept transfer students based on a definition of capacity established by each individual district. In practice, this means that very different policies may be in place from district to district, and vacancies may vary widely from rank to rank.

At a recent State Board of Education meeting that involved another open transfer call, Stacey Butterfield, Superintendent of Jenks Public Schools, acknowledged that Jenks’ policy defines capacity so that students who would take courses in the same school building may nevertheless face different responses to their transfer requests.

Overall, enrollment at Jenks remains slightly lower than the number of students in the 2019-2020 school year, according to figures from the Oklahoma State Department of Education.

During the hearing on Morales’ appeal, members of the State Board of Education expressed frustration with the situation.

“These parents are desperate for other opportunities,” said state board member Estela Hernandez, “and it seems like this system just won’t budge.”

“I echo my sentiment from two months ago: I hate this,” board member Trent Smith said. “It’s horrible.”

While the expansion of open transfer between public schools has been touted as a way to increase educational opportunities for students across the state, many families like the Morales have been left behind.

Proponents of more school choice noted additional options, including allowing state funding to follow a student to any school, including private schools, would benefit and empower many families moving still between the cracks.

During the 2022 legislative session, Senate Pro Tempore Speaker Greg Treat, R-Oklahoma City, introduced a bill to create the Oklahoma Empowerment Account (OEA) program. Under the program, most students eligible to enroll in a public school would be eligible for an AEO, which would have provided parents with a portion of their child’s per-student public funding to pay for a range of educational services, including tuition fees in private schools.

The bill was approved by Governor Kevin Stitt but did not allow a vote in the Senate.

Treat has vowed to raise the issue again in the 2023 session, and Stitt was easily re-elected this month as a strong supporter of more school choice.

Similarly, Ryan Walters, who is Stitt’s education secretary, was elected this month to become Oklahoma’s next superintendent of public instruction. Walters campaigned on a strong platform of support for parent empowerment and greater school choice.

While Walters supported the expansion of Oklahoma’s open transfer law, he said the state still needs to maximize opportunities for parents to get a quality education for their children.

“Parents need more choice in Oklahoma,” Walters said. “We need to do better, provide more options, and provide the most advanced educational opportunities in the country. We will do better.

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Five Memorial seniors commit to varsity athletics https://adventurebase100.org/five-memorial-seniors-commit-to-varsity-athletics/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 05:15:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/five-memorial-seniors-commit-to-varsity-athletics/ EVANSVILLE, Ind. (WFIE) – Five seniors from Reitz Memorial High School have signed their national Letter of Intent. Four of the signers won back-to-back IHSAA Football State Championships with the Tigers and went undefeated in their final season. Kennedy Neighbors, Ella Hamner and Lydia Bordfeld have signed to play football at Indiana University, Evansville University […]]]>

EVANSVILLE, Ind. (WFIE) – Five seniors from Reitz Memorial High School have signed their national Letter of Intent.

Four of the signers won back-to-back IHSAA Football State Championships with the Tigers and went undefeated in their final season.

Kennedy Neighbors, Ella Hamner and Lydia Bordfeld have signed to play football at Indiana University, Evansville University and Indiana Southern University respectively. Emily Mattingly, who was also on the state championship teams, chose to pursue her basketball career at Indiana Wesleyan University. Nicklaus Wangler signed to play baseball at Wabash College.

Neighbours, who committed to Indiana University as an 8th grader, was a varsity player for four years and served as a team captain in his junior and senior years. The Neighbors scored 57 goals and had 69 assists in his four years for the Tigers – including the assist in second overtime in the state championship game of his junior season. She received many individual honors as a Tiger including, All-City Honorable Mention and Academic All-City her freshman season, Indiana Soccer Coach Association (ISCA) 3rd Team All-State, Indiana Coaches Girls Sport Association (ICGSA) 2nd Team, and Academic All-City as a sophomore, United Soccer Coaches Association Region Team, ISCA 1st Team All-State, ICGSA 1st Team, on the High School All-American Watch List as a junior, and ISCA 1st Team All- State, ICGSA 1st Team, Zionsville Lady Eagle invites the All-Tournament Team, Evansville Co-Player of the Year, Conference Co-Player of the Year and Kiwanis Award winner of her senior season. She was 1st team All-City, All-Conference, All-District, and on the All-Metro team her sophomore, junior, and senior seasons. She will also participate in the annual All-American High School game in December. Kennedy is the president of BESTIES, a member of the National Honor Society, Tiger Pride, Student Council and Student Athlete Advisory Council. At IU, she plans to major in biology or biochemistry and pursue a career in the dental or medical field.

Hamner was a MAXPREPS Indiana High School Athlete of the Week after scoring 3 goals in the IHSAA State Finals, which tied the IHSAA record and set the 2A record. Hamner was Academic All-State, 1st Team All-SIAC, 1st Team All-District his junior and senior years, as well as 2nd Team All-State and United Soccer Coaches All-Central Region Team junior year, and 1st Team All-State, conference co-player of the year and Evansville co-player of the year in his senior season. Ella is also involved with student council, BESTIES, Tiger Pride and a member of the National Honor Society. She plans to go to pre-physical therapy.

Bordfeld has been a varsity player for the Tigers on the football team since her sophomore year and on the basketball team for all four years. In addition to receiving several honors for basketball, she was honorable mention All-City junior year and 1st team All-District, 2nd team All-State and 1st team All-City her senior football campaign. Bordfeld is also a member of the National Honors Society, Tiger Pride, BESTIES and Tiger Fest.

While Mattingly has thrived defensively on the football field as a college player since her sophomore year, she fell in love with basketball at a young age. She was on the varsity basketball team for all four years of high school. She was 1st Team All-Conference her freshman year, 2nd Team All-Conference her sophomore year and honorable mention All-Conference her freshman year, and she was Academic All-City (grades 9-11). In addition to several individual basketball and football honors, Mattingly also boasts an outstanding academic resume. Emily is a member of the National Honors Society, recipient of Tomorrow’s Workforce Leadership Award, honored in Young Optimist Appreciation Day and the IHSAA Mental Attitude Award after winning the 2022 Soccer Championship. She is also a member of the Advisory Board student athletes and the student council. Mattingly will pursue a nursing career at Indiana Wesleyan.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Wangler didn’t get a chance to have a baseball season in his freshman year, but he’s been on the varsity baseball team since his sophomore year. Wangler is a two-time sectional champion, was on the All-Metro team his freshman year, and was Academic All-City his sophomore and graduate years. He is a member of the National Honors Society, in Tiger Pride, and leads student sections at other sporting events. Nick plans to study business administration at Wabash College.

Courtesy of: Memorial Athletics

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Council met to discuss trams | News, Sports, Jobs https://adventurebase100.org/council-met-to-discuss-trams-news-sports-jobs/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 05:10:26 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/council-met-to-discuss-trams-news-sports-jobs/ 99 years ago in 1923 The Warren City Council met in special session to consider the streetcar problem and learn the attitude of the Pennsylvania-Ohio Electric Co. toward Warren and its lines there. The special meeting was called by Mayor JD McBride after contacting General Manager Graham of the PO Company and receiving […]]]>

99 years ago in 1923

The Warren City Council met in special session to consider the streetcar problem and learn the attitude of the Pennsylvania-Ohio Electric Co. toward Warren and its lines there.

The special meeting was called by Mayor JD McBride after contacting General Manager Graham of the PO Company and receiving Graham’s promise that he would be present at the meeting.

Another important purpose of the meeting was for the board to allow city attorney Lee to travel to Columbus for the Supreme Court hearing there on the traction company’s motion for leave to drop. its lines west of Youngstown.

The company claimed that the lines were not generating enough revenue to justify their continuation and that fares needed to be increased or the lines dropped as a loss.

50 years ago in 1972

A lot of “firsts” awaited schoolboy football teams from 12 Ohio schools in the first five-site state championship playoff opener, and undefeated Class AAA semifinalists Warren Western Reserve (10- 0) would benefit from some “Supplements” when they met Toledo Scott (8-0-1) at Ohio State University Stadium.

The youngsters would play on artificial turf for the first time in a doubleheader — another first — that was expected to attract the largest crowd to ever watch high school football games in Buckeye State.

Western Reserve defeated Loraine Southview, 28-0, to advance to the state’s historic first playoffs.

25 years ago in 1997

For the third time in less than a year, three drug-sniffing dogs and nearly a dozen police officers from at least four Trumbull County departments combed the hallways and parking lots of Niles High Schools in the search for illegal drugs. And for the second time the search turned out to be empty.

“We can come every time and find nothing. That’s great,” Said Captain Al Kijowski, Niles Mining Officer.

The first raid, held in March, uncovered small portions of marijuana, drug paraphernalia and an illegal knife. Three students have been charged.

10 years ago in 2012

Students at Warren City schools would enjoy the salsa made from locally grown tomatoes. Five bushels of tomatoes were delivered to Warren G. Harding High School.

“We were really happy with what happened today,” said Laureen Postlewait, director of food service at Warren Schools, explaining that the tomatoes’ aroma and vibrant color were surprising for a November delivery.

The tomatoes were the last pickings of field grown tomatoes from the Anguili Farmers Market in Canfield. The produce was purchased from the Lake to River Cooperative, a member-owned cooperative comprising a local group of food producers, processors, and institutional and commercial buyers, including a number of farms, schools, and businesses in the region.

— Compiled from the archives of the Tribune Chronicle by Allie Vugrincic.



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City Council and BISD discuss campus violence and construction https://adventurebase100.org/city-council-and-bisd-discuss-campus-violence-and-construction/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 17:03:29 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/city-council-and-bisd-discuss-campus-violence-and-construction/ At a joint meeting between Beaumont city councilors and Beaumont ISD trustees on Nov. 7, representatives discussed a host of topics ranging from the violence plaguing local schools to a potential bond that would allow construction of a new college and high school. During the more than two-and-a-half-hour evening meeting, city councilors and administrators allowed […]]]>

At a joint meeting between Beaumont city councilors and Beaumont ISD trustees on Nov. 7, representatives discussed a host of topics ranging from the violence plaguing local schools to a potential bond that would allow construction of a new college and high school.

During the more than two-and-a-half-hour evening meeting, city councilors and administrators allowed citizens to comment on agenda items for three minutes before any formal discussion began. The majority of comments were about Beaumont’s violence, both inside and outside of the school. West Brook High School students Saifan Panjwani and Sam Marchand, who have both previously spoken to The Examiner on these issues, were the first two citizens to speak.

“It should not be said that the IBSD is at its lowest point in its history,” Panjwani, a senior official, told the confluence of elected officials. “With the recent increase in crime in our schools, our community has remained fractured. These violent issues began to seep into our everyday school experiences.

“The purpose of my coming here today is to raise awareness of these issues. I believe it is essential to have transparency when it comes to our school district.

“Doesn’t it scare you that our schools are plagued by violence and crime?

If no action is taken in the foreseeable future to alter the academic performance of students, IBSD will undoubtedly be defined by the failure to cultivate and maintain the intellect, Panjwani bet.

Marchand echoed his classmate’s assessment of West Brook’s bleak outlook, explaining, “It’s no secret that the town and the young people who will one day rule it are in dire straits. Recent TEA assessments released in October show pitifully low test scores, with 14 BISD campuses scoring so terrible they weren’t even assessed. Hundreds of incidents of campus violence have been reported, so much so that we have garnered national attention.

“The community faces significant challenges to its future growth and prosperity, and the integrity of the city’s youth is crucial to safeguarding its future. At present, its future does not look good and it is the responsibility of the municipal council and the school board to act. I think I speak for the majority of young people in Beaumont that this is not a place where we would like to stay at the current status. There is no obvious opportunity for us here with crime and woefully underperforming schools.

“It is your responsibility as our leaders…to protect our city from the truly existential issues facing it. Rampant crime (and) violence on nationally renowned campuses threatens to drive young people out of our city.

Panjwani and Marchand’s comments were met with silence from the congregation of more than 50 meeting attendees. However, several points raised by city council members and BISD administrators received applause and even occasional cheers from the crowd of mostly city and district employees. City manager Kenneth Williams asked employees at one point to stand up and be recognized – more than half the crowd obeyed his command.

Before the groups dive into their talking points, “governance expert” Mike Conduff led them through team-building exercises, asking city councilors and administrators to repeatedly praise each other for “maintaining the strong democracy”. Trustees spent more than an hour listening to Conduff’s lecture and brainstorming sessions aimed at moving the city forward.

In an effort to allay citizen and student concerns about campus violence, Councilman Mike Getz suggested installing cameras in every classroom on BISD campuses. While noting how costly the prospect would be, BISD administrators referenced the district’s current plans to install noise and smoke monitors in its high school bathrooms. BISD Superintendent Shannon Allen further explained that the majority of campus violence takes place in more common places, such as bathrooms, hallways and dining rooms.

Although they took no action on any item, the governing bodies agreed to meet at least twice a year, discussed planning a meeting between government groups and local journalists with the aim of “controlling the narrative” coming out of a city they’re trying to grow, talked about installing Wi-Fi in city parks that adjoin BISD schools, thought about ways to make routes to the school safer and launched the prospect of asking residents to support a bond that would build two new schools.

BISD Administrator Denise Wallace-Spooner said it’s no secret that schools in Beaumont are overcrowded, saying the need for a new middle and high school has been evident for some time. Trustees didn’t offer a set dollar amount, but Councilman Taylor Neild — who pointed to declining BISD enrollment — quipped, “Don’t you need kids to fill it in first? “

Neild further claimed that BISD has shown it can spend $300 million and not make students smarter.

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Emily Ward Wins LSU Women’s Basketball Scholarship – LSU https://adventurebase100.org/emily-ward-wins-lsu-womens-basketball-scholarship-lsu/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 21:05:48 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/emily-ward-wins-lsu-womens-basketball-scholarship-lsu/ RED STICK –Emily Ward, a senior for the LSU women’s basketball team, received a scholarship from coach Kim Mulkey on Monday ahead of the team’s shoot in preparation for the season opener at 7 p.m. CT. Coach Mulkey rounded up the team in the locker room before the shoot and surprised Ward. Ward has been […]]]>

RED STICK –Emily Ward, a senior for the LSU women’s basketball team, received a scholarship from coach Kim Mulkey on Monday ahead of the team’s shoot in preparation for the season opener at 7 p.m. CT.

Coach Mulkey rounded up the team in the locker room before the shoot and surprised Ward.

Ward has been an extra the past three seasons for the Tigers, making 13 appearances. Coach Mulkey said Ward is one of the few she is confident can be wired to play all five positions on the court knowing what each position is responsible for.

Off the field, Ward has always represented LSU well. She is doing well in the classroom and has earned a spot on the SEC Winter Academic Honor Roll for the past two seasons and was on the SEC Freshman Academic Honor Roll as a freshman. Ward is on track to graduate with a degree in mass communication in December and plans to enroll in graduate school at LSU.

For the past two seasons, Ward has represented LSU women’s basketball on the SEC Basketball Leadership Basketball Leadership Council. Last year the board meeting was virtual and this year Ward traveled to Birmingham in September for a day of meetings at the SEC offices. The goal of the Leadership Council is for student-athletes to serve as a channel of communication between their teams and the conference office on matters related to the student-athlete experience, student-athlete welfare, and provide comments on the proposed rules governing the SEC and NCAA.

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Superintendent of Hancock Schools Briefs Board on Mileage | News, Sports, Jobs https://adventurebase100.org/superintendent-of-hancock-schools-briefs-board-on-mileage-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 07:06:32 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/superintendent-of-hancock-schools-briefs-board-on-mileage-news-sports-jobs/ HANCOCK — Hancock Public Schools Superintendent Steve Patchin spoke about the two miles the district has in the Nov. 8 ballot at the Hancock City Council meeting on Wednesday. The district has separate mileage requests: ≤ A $4.225 million bond proposal for renovation, furnishing and remodeling, and equipping and re-equipping school buildings; acquisition […]]]>

HANCOCK — Hancock Public Schools Superintendent Steve Patchin spoke about the two miles the district has in the Nov. 8 ballot at the Hancock City Council meeting on Wednesday.

The district has separate mileage requests:

≤ A $4.225 million bond proposal for renovation, furnishing and remodeling, and equipping and re-equipping school buildings; acquisition and installation of educational technology and educational technology equipment for school buildings; and developing and improving a playground, parking areas, walkways and sites. Residents would pay about 1.12 mills in 2023, with an estimated annual average of 1.03 mills over the life of the bond, for a maximum of 26 years.

≤ A 1.5 million five-year renewal of the mileage of the building and site sinking fund that expired in 2022. The fund can be used for the construction or repair of school buildings, for the improvement of the school safety, for the acquisition or upgrading of technology and for any other purposes authorized by law.

Patchin said the bond proposal focuses on three areas: health, safety and discovery in STEM.

For safety reasons, the district will rework parking lots and bus pickup and drop-off, as well as student pickup and drop-off. The Barkell Elementary School playground will also be upgraded, with sections separated by age and developmental level.

“We all know that children learn a lot through playing, and this will be available to our community,” said Patchine.

The kitchens will be renovated. During COVID, the district was cooking between 600 and 900 meals a week for students and their families, which took a toll, Patchin said.

“We’re still in good shape, but as you know with old hardware, if you’re trying to fix it and it’s outdated, good luck finding the parts.” he said.

The district has also taken a big step forward in STEM. The money will fund science, technology, engineering, math and manufacturing labs.

Hancock recently became one of 81 districts designated as a primary school by the Society of Manufacturing Engineers foundation. This came with $300,000 in equipment, teacher training, and long-term corporate relationships.

“We get the equipment through these grants and we bring it; now we need a place to house it,” he said. “And we need a place for these kids to engage in it in the right way.”

To receive certification, students learn the fundamental skills of manufacturing. Students can earn micro-certificates in everything from welding to computer-aided design.

“They could leave tomorrow and take them and find a job wherever they want,” he said. “Or they can use those skills and develop them, go to Gogebic Community College, go to Finlandia, go to Michigan Tech.”

The district also renews its sinking fund, used to repair and upgrade buildings in the district. In the previous five years, the district used the fund for everything from air conditioners to the high school roof.

Upcoming projects include the roof of Hancock Middle School; repair the entrance to Barkell Elementary, which has been moved; replace Barkell windows, which are reaching the end of their life; and improved sound and lighting in the college auditorium.

Unlike the bond issue, there is no interest rate.

Even if voters approve of the two mileage, they will still see a significant tax cut this year, Patchin said.

Last year, the district collected about 8.9 mills. Due to the repayment of previous bonds, residents will still pay around 2.95 mill less, even if both measures are approved.

“Most districts will go out and they will try to capture that from the start because once you are in a certain factory you keep capturing and reinvesting in your district,” said Patchine. “We are not asking you to do this. Our Board of Directors is very aware of the times in which we find ourselves and our community. »

Due to rising property values ​​in the city, the mileage rate charged is expected to decrease over the life of the bond. Property values ​​have increased an average of 3.8% over the past five years, Patchin said; the district assumed 2.5% growth when developing its proposal.

The district’s bond company also factored in rising inflation when preparing the proposal; Patchin expects to be able to withdraw the bond at rates of 4.5% to 4.6%.

“Nothing will change as rates rise because our bond company has made a very conservative estimate of the costs,” he said.

Hancock schools’ total bond debt has been declining since the 1990s, councilor John Haeussler said. Where it was once as high as 11.33 mils, it will now be less than 6.

“I think that’s very reasonable, and even if passed, it puts bond debt at a very reasonable rate for all ratepayers in the community,” he said.



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University of Malawi students protest one semester a year plan https://adventurebase100.org/university-of-malawi-students-protest-one-semester-a-year-plan/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 19:36:14 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/university-of-malawi-students-protest-one-semester-a-year-plan/ Blantyre, Malawi— University of Malawi students are protesting the school’s decision to have only one semester per year, doubling the time needed to graduate. The school closed on Wednesday after students blocked roads leading to campus, and administrators said classes would not resume until the protests ended. Students have been staging protests on and around […]]]>

University of Malawi students are protesting the school’s decision to have only one semester per year, doubling the time needed to graduate. The school closed on Wednesday after students blocked roads leading to campus, and administrators said classes would not resume until the protests ended.

Students have been staging protests on and around campus since Friday in an effort to get officials to abandon the new academic calendar, which is set to begin next year.

On Wednesday, protesters blocked roads leading to campus by burning tires in the streets.

Humble Bondo, president of the university’s Student Council, said protests escalated this week after management failed to address student concerns at a meeting on Monday.

“During the meeting, we presented our position and told them, ‘We won’t stop our vigils until the academic calendar changes,'” Bondo said. “So instead of addressing our issue on the table or the option we gave them, they said we were failing to do so.”

The university, so far, has not indicated a reason for reducing to one semester per year.

Similar protests in September ended in clashes between police and students.

The administration of the University of Malawi said in a statement on Wednesday that it had decided to close the institution because the protests threatened the safety of management and members of the public.

They asked all students to leave the campus before noon.

Some Zomba High Court students are seeking a court injunction against the closure of the University of Malawi following protests over the shortening of the academic year to one semester. (Photo courtesy of University of Malawi Student Council)

Bondo said the institution’s closure was unfair.

“The impact is significant,” he said. “Remember that we are fighting for us to have the same academic calendar, we should complete the period in one year, two semesters. But it will also extend the time that we will stay at the university. So, it will put us in a delicate position.

University spokesman Alfred Banda told VOA on Wednesday that he would not comment further on the matter.

Education expert Benedicto Kondowe blames the university administration for shutting down the facility and said he hopes the matter will be resolved soon.

“If they take longer, some students will drop out because they’ll lose motivation because it doesn’t make sense to do a four-year program in five or six years,” Kondowe said. “So there is already a risk there, what about a girl? Some of the girls will become pregnant, so there are huge implications for officials to consider under the circumstances.

Student union president Bondo told VOA that the students are seeking a court injunction against the school’s closure.

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Get Horry County Literacy Council Murder Mystery Dinner Tickets | Horry County https://adventurebase100.org/get-horry-county-literacy-council-murder-mystery-dinner-tickets-horry-county/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 02:26:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/get-horry-county-literacy-council-murder-mystery-dinner-tickets-horry-county/ The Horry County Literacy Council’s biggest fundraiser, a murder mystery dinner at the Grande Dunes Golf Club, is what makes Horry County read. The event will take place on Saturday February 4th. Production is the primary means by which the Council raises funds, with other means being donations and grants. Funds raised will allow the […]]]>

The Horry County Literacy Council’s biggest fundraiser, a murder mystery dinner at the Grande Dunes Golf Club, is what makes Horry County read.

The event will take place on Saturday February 4th.

Production is the primary means by which the Council raises funds, with other means being donations and grants.

Funds raised will allow the council to “continue to have a positive impact on our community,” said Cheryl Mathieu, council executive director.

This impact currently serves over 60 students with one-on-one tutoring at area libraries and over 200 in after-school programs at recreation centers.

Students are served at recreation centers in North Strand, South Strand, Carolina Forest, and Green Sea.

Tutoring is free, volunteer training is free, and materials are free.

This will be the second year of the Murder Mystery Dinner due to COVID-19. The event took place in 2020 but not in 2021 or 2022.

This year, the Carolina Forest High School Drama Club is writing and producing the script for the presentation “Who Killed Broadway?”

CFHS acting professor Meredith Taylor said the show was “a version of an old Hollywood production from the 1950s when the main character, whose name is Broadway, finds himself murdered and everyone is interrogated.”

Approximately 20 students from the Advanced Drama Department will be involved.

The Council used to welcome students as young as second graders, but COVID-19 has caused a large influx of first graders. From now on, pupils from CP to seniors are supervised by the association.

What the Council expects from the community, as well as more volunteers and students, is for people to attend the Murder Mystery dinner at 6 p.m. on February 4 by getting their tickets in November. Call the council office at 843-945-4105 or use PayPal or check.

In addition to tutoring, the Council offers the Reading Creates program, which is also free with no registration required.

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