Meet Dr. Nancy Young, Tracy’s First African-American Mayor

It’s still hard for Dr. Nancy Young to believe she’s mayor of Tracy, even two years after her election. have come such a long way now. So at the moment, for me, it’s still surreal,” she said. the first African American to be elected mayor. “It’s always an admiration I feel every time I walk into City Hall,” she said. The second born child of five, she spent her early years in Compton at the height of the Bloods-Crips Gang War. The violence that surrounded her, in her neighborhood and at school shaped who she is today. make them feel like I’m not a threat to you and I don’t want to feel like you’re a threat to me. I went to school, I was in class with Crips and Bloods. Many who didn’t even make it, who didn’t live to graduate from high school,” Young said. Then, when she was 13, after a tragic drive-by shooting in their street a few days before school started, the family moved in. system, when I came to San Fernando, I was the only black child in my classes,” she said. for politics started. She was a student council member in middle school and student body president in high school. Young even aspired to be the highest office in the land. I was going to be president of the United States. It’s not my goal now, I don’t want to be President of the United States. I’ve been to DC too many times to see all layers of the bureaucracy,” she said. Young is a cabinet minister, wife, mother, and grandmother. She is the author of seven published books. Despite her three degrees and her extensive involvement in the community, she will not forget p soon had some interactions as she worked to gain support for her campaign. “Some people would stop me and say, ‘Are you running for real? Do you think you can make it as a black woman? We already have a black man on the board. One and that’s it.’ “But that hasn’t stopped her. Since her election, the city council has diversified. Young looks forward to what the future holds. “Being in this role for me has really enhanced my ability, I really feel, to do really good things for our city,” she said.

It’s still hard for Dr. Nancy Young to believe she’s mayor of Tracy, even two years after her election.

“We’re still first as people of color, we’re still first as women. It seems like we would have come such a long way now. So right now, to me, it’s still surreal,” she said.

Young is the city’s first directly elected female mayor, only the second African-American member of the city council in city history, and the first African-American to be elected mayor.

“It’s always an admiration I feel every time I walk into City Hall,” she said.

The second born child of five, she spent her early years in Compton at the height of the Bloods-Crips gang war.

The violence that surrounded her, in her neighborhood and at school shaped who she is today.

“It was just certain ways we behaved. I learned to look people in the eye. I learned to talk to people right away to make them feel like I’m not a threat to you and I don’t want to feel like you’re a threat to me I went to school, I was in class with the Crips and the Bloods A lot of those who didn’t even pass, who didn’t didn’t live to graduate from high school,” Young said.

Then, when she was 13, after a tragic drive-by shooting down their street days before school started, the family moved out.

“When we moved to San Fernando, what’s interesting is that I came from a 99% black population, a real caste system. When I arrived in San Fernando, I was the only child black in my classes,” she said.

This is where his love for politics began.

She was on the student council in middle school and was student body president in high school.

Young even aspired to occupy the highest office in the country.

“I was going to quit and be an anchor and then I was going to be President of the United States. That’s not my goal now, I don’t want to be President of the United States. I’ve been to DC too many times to see all layers of bureaucracy,” she said.

Young is a minister, wife, mother and grandmother. She is the author of seven published books.

Despite her three degrees and extensive involvement in the community, she won’t soon forget some of the interactions as she worked to garner support for her campaign.

“Some people would stop me and say, ‘Are you running for real? Do you think you can make it as a black woman? We already have a black man on the board. One and that’s it.’ “

But that didn’t stop her.

Since its election, the municipal council has diversified.

Young looks forward to what the future holds.

“Being in this role for me has really enhanced my ability, I really feel, to do really good things for our city,” she said.

Comments are closed.