New Orleans Council Round Two Races Have Shakes, New Leaders Elected


There are four board seats in New Orleans that will be decided on Saturday. Below are the results of each race: Council District B: Jay Banks concedes to Lesli Harris Can’t see the results? Tap here. Jay Banks conceded to Lesli Harris on Saturday night after securing more than 55% of the vote to claim the victory. Banks has been a District B city councilor for three and a half years. Harris is a first-time candidate who has been a lawyer in 20 years. During a debate on the “Hot Seat,” she said her time as chief of staff at Loyola University showed that she could reach consensus and solve problems. Harris said neighbors shared their frustration with issues of crime and quality of life, adding: “We need a change.” She criticized Banks’ “arrogance”. She won 37% of the primary vote. District C Council: Freddie King III, projected winner, Freddie King III got his first term as New Orleans city councilor. King won the post with over 60% of the vote against challenger Stephanie Bridges 38%. King described himself in the hot seat debate as a small business owner who was born and raised in District C. He previously worked for former District C city councilor Nadine Ramsey, an experience that he said was the prepared for the job. He also touted his support for the Louisiana Democratic Party, Governor John Bel Edwards and US Representative Troy Carter. He obtained 44% of the primary votes. District D Council: Eugene Green Predicted Winner Eugene Green is the predicted winner of the New Orleans District D race. Green got less than 100 more votes than his challenger Troy Glover. Green lives in Pontchartrain Park and said his experience in federal, state and local governments prepares him for the role. He also owned a property management company, he said, and the combination of experiences in the public and private sectors will help him “provide more resources and opportunities.” He touted the endorsements of the Alliance of Good Government and the New Orleans Coalition. Green said he was keen to take care of the quality of life and ensure that taxpayer dollars “are spent efficiently.” He obtained 35% of the votes in the primaries. Glover’s campaign issued the following statement saying they would contest the race due to the proximity of his margin: “We will contest the race due to the low margin. However, Troy called Eugene to congratulate him on a good night’s sleep. . “District E Council: Oliver Thomas Claims Victory Oliver Thomas claims victory Saturday night, back on New Orleans City Council. Thomas got 58% of the vote against 42% of Cyndi Nguyen. Nguyen held the position for three and a half years. Thomas was elected District B Council Representative in 1994 before winning a city-wide seat in 2002. In 2007, he pleaded guilty to a federal corruption charge and was sentenced to 37 months in prison. Thomas served his sentence in 2010 and hosted a radio talk show on WBOK. Thomas has said he is keen to work on policy and legislative solutions to move District E forward. He cited the high crime rate and illegal dumping in East New Orleans as issues he is eager to address. . He won 45% of the primary votes.

There are four board seats in New Orleans to be decided on Saturday.

Here are the results of each race:

District B Council: Jay Banks concedes to Lesli Harris

Can’t see the results? Tap here.

Jay Banks conceded to Lesli Harris on Saturday night after securing more than 55% of the vote to claim the victory.

Banks has been a District B city councilor for three and a half years.

Harris is a first-time candidate who has been a lawyer in 20 years. During a debate on the “Hot Seat,” she said her time as chief of staff at Loyola University showed that she could reach consensus and solve problems.

Harris said neighbors shared their frustration with issues of crime and quality of life, adding: “We need a change.” She criticized Banks’ “arrogance”.

She won 37% of the primary vote.

District C Council: Freddie King III projected winner

Freddie King III got his first term as a New Orleans city councilor.

King won the post with over 60% of the vote against challenger Stephanie Bridges 38%.

King described himself in the hot seat debate as a small business owner who was born and raised in District C. He previously worked for former District C city councilor Nadine Ramsey, an experience that he said was the prepared for the job. He also touted his support for the Louisiana Democratic Party, Governor John Bel Edwards and US Representative Troy Carter. He won 44% of the primary votes.

District D Council: Eugene Green Projected Winner

Eugene Green is the expected winner of the New Orleans District D race.

Green got less than 100 more votes than his challenger Troy Glover.

Green lives in Pontchartrain Park and said his experience in federal, state and local governments prepares him for the role. He also owned a property management company, he said, and the combination of experiences in the public and private sectors will help him “provide more resources and opportunities.” He touted the endorsements of the Alliance of Good Government and the New Orleans Coalition. Green said he was keen to take care of the quality of life and ensure that taxpayer dollars “are spent efficiently.” He obtained 35% of the votes in the primaries.

Glover’s campaign released the following statement saying they would contest the race due to its proximity to its margin:

“We’re going to compete in the race because of the tight margin. However, Troy called Eugene to congratulate him on a good night’s sleep.”

District E Council: Oliver Thomas claims victory

Oliver Thomas took the win on Saturday night, returning to New Orleans City Council.

Thomas obtained 58% of the vote against 42% for Cyndi Nguyen.

Nguyen held the position for three and a half years.

Thomas was elected District B Council Representative in 1994 before winning a city-wide seat in 2002.

In 2007, he pleaded guilty to a federal corruption charge and was sentenced to 37 months in prison. Thomas completed his sentence in 2010 and hosted a radio show on WBOK. Thomas said he wanted to work on political and legislative solutions to move District E forward.

He cited the high crime rate and illegal dumping in New Orleans East as issues he is eager to address. He obtained 45% of the votes in the primaries.


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