police department – Adventurebase100 http://adventurebase100.org/ Sat, 26 Mar 2022 05:42:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://adventurebase100.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png police department – Adventurebase100 http://adventurebase100.org/ 32 32 Chicago City Council Committee Attempts to Dry Up Stolen Cell Phone Market Again https://adventurebase100.org/chicago-city-council-committee-attempts-to-dry-up-stolen-cell-phone-market-again/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 23:12:21 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/chicago-city-council-committee-attempts-to-dry-up-stolen-cell-phone-market-again/ The city council has tried several times over the years to dry up the market for stolen cellphones dumped by street gangs to fund their operations. Yet the armed robberies continue unabated – on the streets, on the CTA and during the avalanche of carjackings. This week, the Licensing Committee tried again. At the request […]]]>

The city council has tried several times over the years to dry up the market for stolen cellphones dumped by street gangs to fund their operations.

Yet the armed robberies continue unabated – on the streets, on the CTA and during the avalanche of carjackings.

This week, the Licensing Committee tried again.

At the request of Mayor Lori Lightfoot and South Side Ald. Leslie Hairston (5th), the committee on Wednesday unanimously approved an order that dramatically increases fines and penalties for junk dealers, pawnshops and bogus phone repair shops that buy and resell cellphones stolen.

Instead of a fine of up to $2,000 for each violation, the maximum penalty would increase to $10,000 for each illegal sale. Two or more violations within two years would cost the company its license for four years. No one could open on the premises for a year. Unlicensed companies would be subject to the same fines and penalties.

Hairston said the order was triggered by a carjacking in his neighborhood that turned deadly.

“They got $100 for the cell phone. But a young man lost his life,” Hairston said.

“We…have had a long history of trying to get these people to do the right thing. It’s a way to increase the fines hoping they become more responsible.

In fact, Hairston argued, the one-year revocation for a specific address was not long enough to prevent “another family member or friend from reopening on the same site and continuing the same practices.”

Former mayor Rahm Emanuel desperately tried to dry up the black market for stolen cellphones after his then-teenage son had his cellphone stolen on the street from their Ravenswood home.

The order defended by Emanuel prohibited the purchase of any cell phone from a minor and prohibited thrift stores, kiosks and service providers from purchasing or activating any cell phone until the number of series is cross-checked against a database of stolen phones.

These same stores were required to make their records available for inspection and to notify the police if someone tried to sell a stolen phone.

The order also tightened the regulatory grip on pawnshops and second-hand dealers who deal in stolen phones. Retailers with five or more used cell phones were required to obtain a used dealer’s license.

Business owners were also required to stick stickers with the inventory number on used cell phones, maintain an inventory of accepted phones, cross-check the database of stolen and lost cell phones, and issue a receipt to the buyer.

Hairston complained on Wednesday that the order “is not being enforced as it should be.”

Trade and Consumer Protection Commissioner Ken Meyer countered that annual inspections show 94% compliance.

“When an individual brings in a cell phone to resell it to the used dealer, that dealer is responsible for keeping that cell phone there for 30 days. They cannot sell it on the 25th day. They cannot sell it on the Day 22,” Meyer said.

“This cell phone [also] must be recorded in a register of stolen goods, which is updated daily. Our investigators are inspecting this log to make sure it’s there. And the owner must check the police department’s records on the computer system daily to make sure the cell phone isn’t reported as “stolen.”

Hairston was unimpressed.

“They don’t. In the incident I am referring to, he was sold hours after the murder,” she said.

Meyer replied: “That’s why we’re cracking down. … That’s why we want to increase fines and penalties.

Detective George Hilbring described himself as the Chicago Police Department’s “pawnbroker and thrift dealer liaison”.

Hilbring said he is notified “whenever there is a hit” on the serial number of a stolen cellphone. This has happened twice in the past four days, he said.

But when Hilbring admitted under questioning that he was a “one-man show”, Hairston said, “You could use some help.”

In the Hairston neighborhood homicide, Hilbring said, the assailant immediately took the tablet to a thrift store, and “our detectives were able to retrieve it” from the store.

That store, Hillbring added, “did not initially report the transaction and they have since been cited.”

Hairston replied: ‘So they’ve been cited ever since and a young man is dead. Does that seem fair to you? »

When Hilbring said, “That’s why we’re here to increase fines,” Hairston replied, “We have to make it stick. The only way to stop this is to stop them.

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Best quotes from Vancouver city council and mayor: 2021 https://adventurebase100.org/best-quotes-from-vancouver-city-council-and-mayor-2021/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 00:05:13 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/best-quotes-from-vancouver-city-council-and-mayor-2021/ [ad_1] Michael Wiebe: “It’s been an emotional roller coaster for sure, and the support has been pretty amazing” Your mayor and 10 city councilors had a lot to say this year. In fact, they say a lot every year. But I had to get into this preamble somehow, and that opening sentence is what I […]]]>


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Michael Wiebe: “It’s been an emotional roller coaster for sure, and the support has been pretty amazing”

Your mayor and 10 city councilors had a lot to say this year.

In fact, they say a lot every year.

But I had to get into this preamble somehow, and that opening sentence is what I found.

I’m tired, you’re tired, we’re all tired.

So without further ado, I bring you some memorable quotes from 2021 from each of your 11 chosen ones.

Here is…

Trial

“It’s been an emotional roller coaster for sure, and the support has been pretty amazing. I had a few counselors who called me crying this morning. – Com. Michael wiebe the day he learned that BC Supreme Court Justice John Steeves had dismissed the lawsuit brought by 15 citizens who alleged Wiebe was in conflict of interest because of his vote in May 2020 on a temporary terrace program.

“The reality is that not much is going to change for me. As a caucus, sometimes we voted together, sometimes we didn’t. I expect this to continue. – Com. Melissa De Genova suddenly being the only representative of the NPA on the board after the four colleagues with whom she was elected have all left the party.

“This budget is a broken promise to Vancouver taxpayers, residents, tenants, landlords, families, small businesses and youth in our city – a council pledge made on the motion brought forward by the mayor that council will not exceed a five percent property tax increase. The Council has promised one thing and done the opposite. – Com. Lisa dominato on the majority of the council approving a property tax increase of 6.35 percent.

Com. Pete Fry. Dan Toulgoet archive photo

Property of the Little Mountain

“It is oddly perverse that in our city, in a context of woefully unaffordable housing, this particular piece of land lies fallow for more than a decade during an interest-free vacation at taxpayer expense. Obviously, it was a good deal for Holborn, but I hesitate to single them out – after all, these were the horrific days of the Wild West campaign contributions to provincial and local governments of the day. – Com. Pete fry on the publication of the contract between the Government of British Columbia and Holborn Properties Ltd. for the redevelopment of the Little Mountain social housing site in Vancouver.

“Here is the agreement, we are 115 square kilometers between Boundary Road and University Endowment Lands, or 115 kilometers against 510.1 million square kilometers worldwide. So we really have to be careful about what we’re doing to make things happen and have an impact on the planet, and what we can do in the coming months. “- Com. Colleen Hardwick on council approval of an ambitious $ 500 million climate plan to reduce natural gas heating in existing buildings, discourage vehicle use and find less polluted means to produce and transport construction materials.

Blighconseil
Com. Rebecca Bligh. Rob Kruyt / BIV News

Climate change

“This is where the great cities of the world go, and it’s because we have to work together as cities. You can’t just look at Vancouver and say, well, this is our people and this is our impact on [greenhouse gas] emissions, and therefore we should not do anything because we are too small. – Com. Rebecca Bligh the city’s climate plan and its dismissive critics who say Vancouver can’t have an impact on global pollution.

“Because I’m married to a police officer, I think I’m probably one of the most knowledgeable advisers in terms of what’s going on day to day and the types of calls members face. I have the benefit of not only having this perspective in terms of knowing what calls the agents are dealing with each day, but I also have the advisor’s perspective of hearing the residents. So like any resident of Vancouver, I have a similar interest in ensuring that we have an appropriate level of public safety in the city. – Com. Sarah Kirby Yung on his support for the Vancouver Police Department’s budget request to council.

“I understand that I was not arrested – that’s good. I don’t think it would have been fair to stop me because we were distributing safe drugs – not dangerous drugs – and that was a protest. – Com. Jean Swanson Vancouver police failed to arrest her in July for distributing heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine obtained from the ‘dark web’ to drug addicts in protest to push governments to increase the “safe supply” of drugs

boyle__christine.8441
OneCity Council. Christine Boyle. Dan Toulgoet archive photo

Rental housing in Shaughnessy

“This particular neighborhood has been off-limits to most Vancouverites at most income levels for a very long time. In a city as diverse as ours, I don’t think we should have neighborhoods where tenants can’t find housing. – Com. Christine boyle on his support for a 24-unit rental housing project in Shaughnessy after a majority of his colleagues rejected the developer’s initial proposal in 2019, largely because of concerns identified by a nearby hospice.

“You don’t go into this thinking it’s going to be an easy life, you go there to do service. And I have to say, despite the hours – which can be very exhausting and my body takes a beating sitting in these chairs – that I still love him. I still love the job, and it still feels meaningful and important to me. – Com. Adriane carr, who was first elected in 2011, on the board’s record number of hours since being elected in 2018.

“There seems to be this sort of thing that I’m against the police or something like that, which isn’t true. I know my opponents often try to stir up this conflict, but the conflict is not there. – Mayor Kennedy Stewart, who is also chairman of the Vancouver Police Board.

Gilkelley
Gil Kelley, the city’s former chief town planner. Dan Toulgoet archive photo

Goodbye, goodbye Gil

Here is a bonus quote from Gil kelley, the city’s chief town planner until in March he reached a “mutual and sympathetic” agreement with the city council to quit his job:

“I don’t want to speculate on the current position of the council. Maybe there is a slight change in their focus, tone, or anxieties, but I can’t speculate on what that is. I just know it’s been a good working relationship so far – with the majority of the board anyway. “

mhowell@glaciermedia.ca

@Howellings

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Hoover Council Approves 154 Age Restricted Apartments, 10 Cottages at Trace Crossings https://adventurebase100.org/hoover-council-approves-154-age-restricted-apartments-10-cottages-at-trace-crossings/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 03:58:20 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/hoover-council-approves-154-age-restricted-apartments-10-cottages-at-trace-crossings/ [ad_1] On Monday evening, Hoover City Council voted 5-1 to allow Signature Homes to build 154 “working adult” apartments and 10 rental cabins as part of the Knox Square development in Trace Crossings. The apartments and cottages will be built on 6.5 acres along the Stadium Trace Parkway across from the Hoover Metropolitan Stadium and […]]]>


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On Monday evening, Hoover City Council voted 5-1 to allow Signature Homes to build 154 “working adult” apartments and 10 rental cabins as part of the Knox Square development in Trace Crossings.

The apartments and cottages will be built on 6.5 acres along the Stadium Trace Parkway across from the Hoover Metropolitan Stadium and between Discovery United Methodist Church and the previously approved 118 single family homes that will be known as Knox Square.

Apartments and cottages will be subject to an ‘age limit’, which means that at least one person living there must be at least 55 years old and that no minor under the age of 19 can live there over 60 days per calendar year.

Developer Jonathan Belcher, president of Signature Homes, said residents of the nearby community of Chestnut Ridge repeatedly asked him to put something on the property other than a hotel, and he promised them he would look for it. another alternative.

The company has been so successful with its single-family home communities reserved for residents aged 55 and over that it also wants to offer a rental option to people in that age group.

He predicts that about two-thirds of apartments would have two bedrooms, while the other third would have one bedroom. The typical size would be 800 to 1,200 square feet, and he expects the rent to be $ 1,800 to $ 2,400 per month, he said. There should be around 10 different floor plans for the two-bedroom apartments, he said.

The proposed name is Knox Square Apartments. Most of the complex is expected to have three floors, but there will be a corner section with four floors, Belcher said.

He sees this as a viable option for people who don’t want to pay $ 400,000 to $ 500,000 to get into a three bedroom house in a community 55 and over such as Abingdon by the River, a- he declared.

His plans include a 10,000 square foot amenity building with function rooms and a fitness center, swimming pool, and areas for grilling and outdoor activities, he said. The resort is said to be an independent living center, with no central food and beverage service or medical or nursing services, according to Signature Homes’ zoning request.

The $ 40 million apartment complex is expected to generate around $ 180,000 per year in property taxes, Belcher said.

In early November, many residents of the community of Abingdon, another community 55 and over located just off the Knox Square development, objected to the idea of ​​moving apartments there when Hoover Planning and Zoning Commission reviewed the proposal and recommended its approval.

Some of the residents then said they were concerned it would reduce the value of their property and add more traffic to what they consider to be an already congested Stadium Trace Parkway. But no one spoke out against the apartments and cottages at Monday’s council meeting.

Casey Middlebrooks was the only councilor to vote against the apartment project. Middlebrooks said Signature Homes will build a great community there. He has no doubts about the quality of their product, but he believes that authorizing apartments there will “accelerate development” of this property before the proper infrastructure is in place to support it.

The city is working to create an alternate route for traffic entering and exiting Trace Crossings and Blackridge, but that route is not yet in place.

Belcher will likely have the apartments built before this road is in place, but if the property were to remain in commercial use, development could take longer and allow more time for infrastructure construction, Middlebrooks said.

Councilor Curt Posey said he voted in favor of apartments because he believes there is a demand for this type of housing in the 55 and over age group. Not everyone in that age range can afford or need the larger homes that are found in other communities 55 and older, Posey said.

He also thinks apartments are better for this site than a hotel or gas station, he said. Also, restricting the age of apartments generates property taxes for the school system, but does not increase the student body in schools, he said.

Belcher said it would likely take six to eight months for the apartment complex to be fully designed and licensed, but he hopes to start construction by the end of 2022 and have apartments built and rented out in the during 2024.

In other Monday night business, Hoover City Council:

  • Approved plans for a 3000 square foot clubhouse and amenity center for the single family community of 118 Knox Square homes adjacent to the apartments and cottages.
  • Approved plans for an Aqua Tots swim school at 1694 Montgomery Highway in the Center at Riverchase shopping mall across from Hoover Town Hall, on condition that there is no blasting as the excavation is being done for swimming pools.
  • Appointed Charlie Faulkner as a member of the new Hoover Health Care Authority, for a six-year term.
  • Authorized the Hoover Police Department to use $ 93,000 of funds received to house federal inmates to purchase eight sets of night vision tools and related accessories.
  • Declared Feb. 25-27 sales tax holiday for inclement weather preparedness, waiving city sales tax for certain items that can be used to prepare for inclement weather. These items are listed on the town’s website and include tarps, weather radios, flashlights, batteries, chargers, plywood, and first aid kits.
  • Authorized the mayor to enter into an agreement with Shelby County for the county to provide Hoover with aerial photographs and topographic mapping of 176 square miles in and around Hoover, at a cost not to exceed $ 35,500.
  • Authorized the mayor to hire USI Insurance Services to help the city find a P&C insurance provider.
  • Agreed to hire Temple, Utilicom Supply, Southern Lighting and Traffic Systems, Cubic ITS and Buffalo Electric to provide traffic control and road safety equipment for the city.

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Baltimore City Council Committee Holds Meeting to Hear Student Experiences Riding MTA Buses at School https://adventurebase100.org/baltimore-city-council-committee-holds-meeting-to-hear-student-experiences-riding-mta-buses-at-school/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/baltimore-city-council-committee-holds-meeting-to-hear-student-experiences-riding-mta-buses-at-school/ BALTIMORE — The Baltimore Education Workforce and Youth Committee held a public hearing to hear the experiences of students in schools across the city who take MTA buses to school and return. “It was a very exacerbating and unsettling experience,” said one parent. The mother spoke on behalf of her children at Thursday’s hearing. She […]]]>

BALTIMORE — The Baltimore Education Workforce and Youth Committee held a public hearing to hear the experiences of students in schools across the city who take MTA buses to school and return.

“It was a very exacerbating and unsettling experience,” said one parent.

The mother spoke on behalf of her children at Thursday’s hearing. She said they struggled to get to school on time because buses often passed her children at the bus stop.

She said an alternative bus stop is also not a good option as they have to pass abandoned properties and people on drugs.

“I’m still worried about their safety,” she said.

And she is not alone. A teacher speaking on behalf of one of her students has shared a horrific story of a recent encounter with a potential predator as a girl walked towards the bus stop.

“A car pulled up right in front of me and an old man offered to drive me,” the teacher said, referring to the story her students told her. “I said no but he kept circling around me.”

MTA’s Holly Arnold said the agency’s police department works closely with BPD. She said MTA uses crime hotspot data to learn where its officers are most needed.

“It’s huge for me. It’s a top priority for our agency,” Arnold said. “As a transit rider, I want to make sure everyone feels safe on our buses. , especially students.

But safety isn’t the only issue affecting students who ride MTAs. A nonprofit called the Fund for Educational Excellence surveyed nearly 300 students and found that long commutes and unreliable service were also issues for students.

“Many students told us they were late at least once and sometimes several times a week,” said Kwame Wyatt of the Fund for Educational Excellence. “Public transport is the main reason they gave for being late for school.”

In the nonprofit’s report, students believe adding more shelter and better lighting at bus stops would help them feel safer.

They also recommend increasing the number of buses and their frequency of operation to help them get to school on time.

“An efficient and effective bus system is really important for student success,” said City Councilor Odette Ramos.

Ramos said the board will consider the information received during the hearing and determine the next step on how it can help improve service to students.

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City settles 2 lawsuits, one involving the conduct of a former LPD agent, the other alleging a toxic workplace for women | Local government https://adventurebase100.org/city-settles-2-lawsuits-one-involving-the-conduct-of-a-former-lpd-agent-the-other-alleging-a-toxic-workplace-for-women-local-government/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 01:18:45 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/city-settles-2-lawsuits-one-involving-the-conduct-of-a-former-lpd-agent-the-other-alleging-a-toxic-workplace-for-women-local-government/ [ad_1] Lincoln City Council Meeting 12-13-2021 A former Lincoln police officer told Lincoln City Council on Monday that sexual harassment was “ubiquitous” in the department. Sarah Williams spoke on Monday, sometimes in tears, recounting the physical and mental toll the experience put on her. Officer Sarah Williams Williams spoke on the same day that council […]]]>


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Lincoln City Council Meeting 12-13-2021


A former Lincoln police officer told Lincoln City Council on Monday that sexual harassment was “ubiquitous” in the department.

Sarah Williams spoke on Monday, sometimes in tears, recounting the physical and mental toll the experience put on her.






Officer Sarah Williams


Williams spoke on the same day that council was notified of a $ 65,000 settlement in a lawsuit she filed against the city.

In a 21-page complaint, Williams’ attorney Kelly Brandon described the sexual harassment Williams suffered during her time at the LPD, ranging from sexual comments from male officers that began when she was an intern in 2013 to a male sergeant attempting to kiss her, “which was unsolicited and an unwanted lead from a supervisor”.

Brandon said Williams reported these and other incidents but nothing was done to address the culture.

Williams said when she brought her concerns to supervisors up to then-boss Jeff Bliemeister, nothing was done.

Instead, Williams said she was pressured to provide the name of a colleague who told her she was sexually assaulted by a male officer, but the department did nothing. to investigate.

Williams quit his job with LPD on March 6, 2019 and now works for the Omaha Police Department.

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APD, city looks for ways to attract police candidates – Austin Daily Herald https://adventurebase100.org/apd-city-looks-for-ways-to-attract-police-candidates-austin-daily-herald/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 00:52:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/apd-city-looks-for-ways-to-attract-police-candidates-austin-daily-herald/ [ad_1] Austin has to hire cops, but they don’t get applications. It was at the heart of a working session Monday evening after the regular meeting of the city council. Reflecting a state and nationwide problem, the Austin Police Department has seen a strong downward trend in the number of applicants in recent months. For […]]]>


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Austin has to hire cops, but they don’t get applications.

It was at the heart of a working session Monday evening after the regular meeting of the city council. Reflecting a state and nationwide problem, the Austin Police Department has seen a strong downward trend in the number of applicants in recent months.

For two open positions, APD received only one candidate. Police Chief David McKichan told council members this is emblematic of what many departments are seeing.

“Right now we’re facing a scenario that I think is going to last a few years,” McKichan said. “Hiring agents, finding candidates is a struggle for all agencies. I know of a service that got no response.

There is also a shortage of numbers in the ranks of students, as fewer of them enroll in law enforcement programs.

Although nothing was decided on Monday night, McKichan and human resources director Trish Weichmann advocated dropping the 30-minute response time as a way to attract more applicants to the city.

Austin is one of the few departments in the area that still has response time, forcing agents to live within a 30-minute drive of the community.

Weichmann told the board that at least one claimant withdrew his application because he knew he would live outside of that 30-minute requirement.

If the board chose to remove the requirement, then hopefully more population centers would open up, deepening Austin’s own pool of candidates.

“At least that would put us on an equal footing with other communities,” Weichmann said. “Our request is to completely eliminate the 30-minute response time. “

In the ensuing conversation, the board seemed receptive to the idea and included possible incentives that might encourage agents to move into the community.

City Councilor Joyce Poshusta said she had heard concerns in the past about agents not living in the community, but ultimately said she didn’t see much of a problem removing the requirement.

“We help the quality and the quantity that we get,” Poshusta said. “There have been concerns in the past that our officers live in the community. Even though we get agents that are out of our response time, they are very involved in our community. “

Councilor Mike Postma, while tentatively in favor of abolishing the 30-minute response times, has raised concerns that officers are not part of the community they serve and are not making that connection.

“I had a little trouble with this one,” Postma said. “I don’t like forcing people to quote-no, to live in our city, but I don’t think 30 minutes is unreasonable. I don’t know if that will bring us a ton of candidates. I struggle with the idea of ​​not having officers living in Austin.

Discussions ultimately turned to possible incentives to get agents to apply. This broke down into two ways:

• Referral Incentive: A City of Austin employee who recommends someone, who then applies and is successful, would result in the employee receiving the incentive.

• Student loan repayment: Any candidate who can prove that they have student loan debts upon leaving college would receive up to $ 5,000 in expense repayments. $ 2,500 would be paid upon successful hiring, with the remaining $ 2,500 paid at the end of the one-year trial period.

This second incentive could also, in theory, be applied to established agents moving to Austin, but instead of repayment of the loan, it would be applied to moving expenses.

“I don’t see schools producing enough students to fill places in Southeast Minnesota,” McKichan explained.

Yet the goal remains to ensure that agents are part of the community in one way or another.

“The objective is not only to hire agents,” said city councilor Oballa Oballa. “At the end of the day, they have to connect with the community.”

In other news:

• It has been announced that in addition to the $ 1.3 million dollar second round of the upcoming US stimulus package in 2022, the city of Austin will receive additional funding of $ 43,718.90 in ARP funding. The money comes from $ 12.7 million in unclaimed ARP funds allocated to the state of Minnesota.

• The City’s Tax Truth Meeting is Wednesday evening at 6:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber.

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LA city council committee pushes motion to arm park rangers – Daily News https://adventurebase100.org/la-city-council-committee-pushes-motion-to-arm-park-rangers-daily-news/ https://adventurebase100.org/la-city-council-committee-pushes-motion-to-arm-park-rangers-daily-news/#respond Wed, 10 Nov 2021 00:53:25 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/la-city-council-committee-pushes-motion-to-arm-park-rangers-daily-news/ [ad_1] By MARGARET SHUTTLEWORTH | City News Service On Tuesday, November 9, a three-person committee of Los Angeles City Council brought forward a controversial motion by city councilor and committee member Joe Buscaino to allow park rangers on duty to carry firearms. The Arts, Parks, Health, Education and Neighborhoods committee moved the motion forward with […]]]>


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By MARGARET SHUTTLEWORTH | City News Service

On Tuesday, November 9, a three-person committee of Los Angeles City Council brought forward a controversial motion by city councilor and committee member Joe Buscaino to allow park rangers on duty to carry firearms.

The Arts, Parks, Health, Education and Neighborhoods committee moved the motion forward with a 2-1 vote, Buscaino and committee chair, Councilor John Lee, voting in favor of the progress of the motion, while Councilor Mike Bonin disagreed.

The motion was introduced in February 2020 and, if approved by the entire city council, would order the city attorney to prepare an amendment to the city’s municipal code to allow park rangers to carry firearms.

Supporters of the motion note that the city’s 28 forest rangers are sworn peace officers and receive basic police training after they are hired. Under Los Angeles City Code 63.41, park rangers are permitted to make arrests but do not carry firearms. In an emergency, they usually call for reinforcements from the Los Angeles Police Department.

The motion to arm park rangers was supported by neighborhood councils representing Arleta, Northwest San Pedro, Hollywood United, Tarzana and Foothills Trails District.

Supporters also include LAPD leader Michel Moore, the Park Law Enforcement Association, the Peace Officers Research Association of California, the United Firefighters of Los Angeles City, the Los Angeles Police Protective League and various homeowners associations.

Forest Park Chief Joe Losorelli told the committee meeting that the increase in violent crime during the pandemic is also impacting safety in parks, and that without guns park rangers have to wait until the LAPD responds to violent situations.

He noted an incident at Elysian Park in which park rangers attempted to make contact with two people drinking beers in the park, but “before they even had enough information to collect the names and numbers of phone of these people, they get shot “.

He added that rangers had to wait 10 minutes for a police response during this incident.

Bonin, who opposed the motion, said he found problems with the argument that park rangers should be armed as they currently have to wait for the police to respond.

“Everyone too. If having to call the cops is a justification for someone to be armed, then … are we going to start next month talking about arming the LADOT agents, are we going to start talking about arming the parking lot guards, let’s go we start talking about arming librarians? There are definitely incidents in our libraries and our librarians have to call agents, ”Bonin said.

He also added that just last year, city officials pledged to reinvent public security and attempt to reduce the number of armed officers in public life.

“It makes it look like it’s completely the opposite of that dynamic, that impetus, and what I certainly felt was a commitment from the vast majority of people in LA city government,” he said. Bonin added. “I don’t think most people thought that when we were talking about removing armed police officers from some aspect of daily life in Los Angeles that meant we would start arming other people to deal with these issues. “

Appellants voicing opposition to the motion flooded the committee meeting, with people calling the idea “absurd”, “absurd” and “ridiculous.” Several callers expressed support for a reimagining of public safety and investing away from armed officers and into communities, citing the already high number of police shootings.

“As a neighborhood council that represents Griffith Park, one of the largest urban parks in the United States and so reflects the identity of our neighborhood, we strongly oppose this motion,” said the neighborhood council of Los Feliz in a comment submitted to the city. Advice. The motion was also opposed by neighborhood councils representing Silver Lake, Echo Park, Mid-City and Highland Park.

The Los Feliz neighborhood council said it believed that arming the park rangers “will result in as many Angelenos as possible, especially those from marginalized groups, under threat of being shot by forces of the United Nations. ‘order,’ noting that police in the United States killed 1,004 people and black Americans were 2.5 times more likely to be killed than white Americans.

Black Lives Matter-Los Angeles co-founder Melina Abdullah called the committee meeting to voice BLM’s opposition to arming park rangers.

“I am the mother of three children. I go to the park so that we can get away from the violence of society, ”Abdullah said. “I am a black mother of three black children who see guns against officers as a threat to their lives, so we ask you to vote no on this motion. Park rangers should not be armed.

A man named Craig who introduced himself as a former ranger for a government agency also called to oppose the decision to arm ranger.

“The rangers are not trained for this mission. They are trained for a very different mission… The Rangers are there for one job. The police are there for a different job. They are not the same, they should not be confused, ”he said.

The motion will then go to city council, and not to the public safety committee, according to the office of that committee’s chair, city councilor Monica Rodriguez.

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Whitefish Security CEO to plead guilty to conspiracy to defraud Goguen https://adventurebase100.org/whitefish-security-ceo-to-plead-guilty-to-conspiracy-to-defraud-goguen/ https://adventurebase100.org/whitefish-security-ceo-to-plead-guilty-to-conspiracy-to-defraud-goguen/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 22:57:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/whitefish-security-ceo-to-plead-guilty-to-conspiracy-to-defraud-goguen/ [ad_1] The head of a Whitefish-based security firm whose ties to the city’s former police chief were recently confirmed in a complaint filed by the state Department of Justice’s oversight office has agreed to plead guilty to federal charges of defrauding local venture capitalist Michael Goguen out of millions of dollars and failed to pay […]]]>


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The head of a Whitefish-based security firm whose ties to the city’s former police chief were recently confirmed in a complaint filed by the state Department of Justice’s oversight office has agreed to plead guilty to federal charges of defrauding local venture capitalist Michael Goguen out of millions of dollars and failed to pay taxes on the money, according to new court documents.

Matthew A. Marshall, former CEO of Amyntor Group, is scheduled to appear for a plea change hearing Nov. 10 in U.S. District Court in Missoula, where he will admit federal crimes of wire fraud, money laundering and l tax evasion, under the terms of a plea agreement filed on November 4.

U.S. District Judge Donald Molloy is presiding over the case, with U.S. Assistant Attorney Timothy Racicot serving as lead prosecutor. Marshall is represented by Justin K. Gelfand of Margulis Felfand, LLC.

In return for Marshall’s guilty pleas, prosecutors will recommend that nine additional federal charges be dismissed. The plea deal recommends that Marshall pay Goguen restitution in the amount of $ 2,355,000 for the alleged wire fraud scheme and $ 899,327 to the Internal Revenue Service for tax evasion charges. He also recommends a reduction in Marshall’s level of infringement in exchange for his acceptance of liability, although the court is not bound by any of the recommendations set out in the plea deal.

Even if Molloy agrees to the terms of the plea deal, Marshall still faces a maximum jail term of 35 years in prison and more than half a million dollars in fines. However, federal sentencing guidelines ultimately dictate the parameters of sentencing, and Molloy is not bound by any of the recommendations.

The bizarre case against Marshall first surfaced in July 2020 when he was charged with carrying out a scheme to extract millions of dollars from Goguen, a wealthy businessman and philanthropist. Prosecutors laid additional charges in a substitute indictment in July 2021, while a second substitute indictment in September further amended the charges. The case was due to be tried in December.

The indictment describes an alleged scheme which began in April 2013 in which Marshall fraudulently convinced Goguen, referred to in the documents as “John Doe” but whose identity was independently confirmed by Beacon that he was a former CIA agent and member of an elite reconnaissance force. United States Marine Corps unit. Marshall told Goguen he was “engaged in secret missions around the world” and asked him to fund an “unofficial” paramilitary mission in Mexico, according to a Nov. 4 report. offer of evidence presented by prosecutors. None of these claims are true, according to the file.

Still, Goguen agreed and wired Marshall $ 400,000 on April 25, 2013. Marshall then demanded money from Goguen for four more alleged assignments between October 2013 and March 2016 “based on Marshall’s false claims that he would use the money for the missions ”, according to the offer of proof.

“Marshall did not use the money … for any mission, in Mexico or elsewhere,” the document said. “Instead, he spent the money on personal expenses and on loans and gifts to friends and family members, among other expenses.”

In addition to Marshall’s alleged criminal wrongdoing, his relationship with Goguen had other ramifications in Whitefish, including a direct connection to former Whitefish Police Chief Bill Dial, who abruptly retired in August after headed the department for two decades. Shortly after Dial’s retirement, the state Department of Justice oversight office responsible for overseeing law enforcement training and certification in Montana, the Public Safety Officer Standards and Training Council (POST ), made damning allegations of official misconduct against him.

These allegations are supported by hundreds of text messages exchanged between Dial and Marshall which appear to show the men colluding in a retaliatory effort against Goguen, against which Dial brought a civil action in December 2019. Goguen is also the defendant in one lawsuit that Marshall filed in September 2021.

POST’s complaint against Dial accuses the former police chief of colluding with Marshall to trap fellow police officer Whitefish; falsifying information and lying to city, state and federal investigators; and authorizing Marshall, an “uncontrolled civilian with no POST certification or law enforcement credentials,” physical access to the Whitefish Police Department, access to information on confidential and ongoing police investigations and access confidential criminal justice information protected by state law.

Although Dial was initially given a September 29 deadline to respond to the allegations, he has twice requested more time and the case is still ongoing.

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The Student Council adopts the bill to create the ad hoc committee of university care networks – Le Quotidien du Cavalier https://adventurebase100.org/the-student-council-adopts-the-bill-to-create-the-ad-hoc-committee-of-university-care-networks-le-quotidien-du-cavalier/ https://adventurebase100.org/the-student-council-adopts-the-bill-to-create-the-ad-hoc-committee-of-university-care-networks-le-quotidien-du-cavalier/#respond Fri, 22 Oct 2021 23:46:06 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/the-student-council-adopts-the-bill-to-create-the-ad-hoc-committee-of-university-care-networks-le-quotidien-du-cavalier/ [ad_1] The Student Council passed its fall budget, a resolution supporting Divest U.Va. and a bill to create the ad hoc committee of university care networks at its general meeting on Tuesday evening. Community response to crises The bill creating the ad hoc committee of ONUC was sponsored by Abel Liu, president of the Student […]]]>


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The Student Council passed its fall budget, a resolution supporting Divest U.Va. and a bill to create the ad hoc committee of university care networks at its general meeting on Tuesday evening.

Community response to crises

The bill creating the ad hoc committee of ONUC was sponsored by Abel Liu, president of the Student Council and fourth year student of the College, and Gaby Hernandez, president of the representative body and third year student of the College. , on behalf of the University Healthcare Networks. Coalition, Housing and Residence Life, undocUVA, Black Student Alliance and Political Latinxs United for Movement and Action in Society.

UNOC is a community-based crisis response program that will remove the university police department from non-violent mental health crises involving students. The pilot program is expected to launch in the fall semester of 2022, running 24 hours a day Thursday through Sunday. As part of the program, paid paramedics and qualified graduate student counselors will respond to all mental health crises, interventions with intoxicated people and aggravated situations within the purview of the UPD. The Student Council is allocating $ 19,000 to fund student activity fees for the UNOC pilot program.

ONUC is inspired by the Crisis Assistance Helping Out On The Streets program based in Eugene, Oregon. Rather than sending police officers, CAHOOTS instead sends two-member teams made up of a doctor and a crisis worker to help people in crisis. The program was established in 1989 by the White Bird Clinic and the Eugene Police Department.

The Student Council’s work on the program begins amid concerns about increasing crime this semester, as 10 community alerts have been issued since the start of the fall, ranging from gunshots to roving incidents. A newly created UPD unit, called the Community Oriented Policing Squad, has been criticized by students and law organizations, which are asking the University to reverse its decision to increase the police presence and instead promote economic equality at Charlottesville.

By limiting the presence of the police in mental health crises, ONUC hopes to improve relations between students and the UPD, especially students with historically marginalized identities. A fall 2020 survey conducted by the Student Council found that students’ experiences with UPD agents sent in response to mental health crises were “overwhelmingly negative”, with one student calling the officers “cold. emotionally “.

Earlier this semester, a student organizer reported repeated and unwelcome attempts by UPD members to contact them.

“The state of mental health crisis response and interventions in aggravated situations at the University is catastrophic,” Liu said. “Students leave mental health crises in handcuffs, are placed in custody and are often further traumatized, either by the university police service’s response to the mental health crisis or by their experience in dealing with their health crises. mental alone. “

The bill also cites the current HRL protocol, which trains resident counselors to contact the UPD, counseling and psychology services, or the UPD in the event of a mental health crisis. Some students, however, reported that the RAs discouraged them from contacting the UPD due to previous negative experiences.

Housing and Residence Life co-chair and fourth-year student Jayla Hart urged officials to pass the bill at Tuesday night’s meeting.

“Bringing the UPD into residential buildings to help students has been very, very stressful, not only for the residents, but also for the RAs and SRs,” Hart said. “I implore you all to consider what we are trying to do in terms of culture change at U.Va., But also to better support students – especially students of color – and other marginalized identities.”

Donavon Lea, BSA vice president and fourth-year student at Batten, added that while he is delighted to see UNOC come to fruition, black students have been calling for these kinds of changes for a long time.

“The BSA has been pushing for these kinds of demands for over 50 years, and it shouldn’t have taken 50 years for something like this to happen,” Lea said.

Originally issued in 1970, BSA request list ask the University to increase the number of black students, faculty and administrations, to divest and demilitarize the UPD and to expand the curriculum, among others.

Central Americans for Empowerment at U.Va., the Afro-Latinx Student Organization at U.Va., the Cultural Organization for Latin Americans at U.Va., the Latinx Leadership Institute at U.Va, the Latinx Peer Mentoring Program and the Coalition of Latin American Identities at U.Va. noted that the Latinx community on Grounds has struggled to access appropriate mental health services for “some time” in a joint statement to Cavalier Daily. Specifically, the groups cited the high cost of medical fees and the inadequacy of the University’s psychological counseling and services program, adding that due to the diversity and intersectionality of the Latinx community, students often find it difficult to find advisers within the CAPS who make them feel represented. and understood.

“UNOC would allow Latinx students and students of color at the University to receive support during a crisis,” the statement said. “Addressing this mental health crisis response issue would allow PLUMAS, and the many Latinx organizations we represent, to advocate for improved mental health resources for Latinx students at the University. “

UNOC has been in development since fall 2020 by several partner organizations – Student Council, HRL, BSA, PLUMAS and undocUVA – as well as university partners, such as UPD and the Equity Center. These five student groups will form the UNOC Coalition 2021-22, which will guide the structure, funding and implementation of the program this year.

Each partner organization will nominate one to four representatives to sit on the coalition each year. The president or president of each organization will automatically serve as the representative and select the other representatives.

The inaugural representatives of the coalition include Liu, Hernandez, Hart, Lea, Tyler Busch, student council representative and college sophomore; Deric Childress Jr., president of BSA and fourth-year college student; Ilyas Saltani, HRL Vice President for Community Development and Residential Inclusion and fourth year student at the College; Caro Campos, president of undocUVA and fourth year student of the College; Paola Linares, vice-president of undocUVA and third year student of the College; and Booker Johnson, Director of Coalition Engagement for the College’s Student Council and Third Year Student.

All partner organizations and representatives are also allowed to leave the coalition for the following academic year, and new organizations can be added with the unanimous consent of all current partner organizations.

The pilot program will be in place at least until the 2024-25 academic year to ensure its implementation and expansion. If successful, the ONUC Coalition will lobby for long-term funding strategies that divert funding from the UPD to ONUC to develop the program. The UNOC Coalition will provide updates on the program at Student Council General Assemblies.

An annex to the ONUC legislation also includes a memorandum of understanding that describes the extent to which partner organizations are involved in the implementation and long-term future achievements of ONUC.

“While ONUC plays a role both in the larger undocUVA campaign on the sanctuary campus and in the historic demands for the divestment and demilitarization of the BSA police, undocUVA and BSA retain full control of their own campaigns, ”the memorandum said. “The student council, in particular, should not interfere with the larger undocUVA and BSA work within the ONUC program. “

The memorandum of understanding will be reviewed by June 30 of each year by representatives on the coalition.

Cease U.Va.

A resolution supporting the university’s environmental divestment from fossil fuels was sponsored by College Fourth Year Student Representative Rand Perry on behalf of the Divest U. Va Coalition, Young Democratic Socialists of America at the Ecosocialist Group of the U.Va. and the student council’s sustainable development agency. The legislation calls on the University to withdraw funds from its endowment to support the use of fossil fuels, which Divest U.Va. is pushing for the University to end by 2022.

The University’s endowment has reached a record high of $ 14.5 billion this year despite the ongoing pandemic. Investments in “real assets” – which include fossil fuel companies, as well as investments in retail and hospitality – represent 10% of the University’s endowment.

“This is a crucial time,” said Perry. “If we can bring students, faculty and community members together, this is a time when real change is possible, but the support of elected officials at the University – us – will help. “

The resolution was adopted unanimously by the representatives.

Budget

The Student Council’s fall 2021 budget is $ 226,855 and will be split among its various branches – the Presidential Cabinet Agency, the Administrative Committee, the newly created Support and Access Services, the Organizations Committee and the representative body.

The student council meets weekly at 6:30 p.m. in the Newcomb South meeting room.


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Board committee adopts changes to KC housing trust fund https://adventurebase100.org/board-committee-adopts-changes-to-kc-housing-trust-fund/ https://adventurebase100.org/board-committee-adopts-changes-to-kc-housing-trust-fund/#respond Thu, 21 Oct 2021 01:56:24 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/board-committee-adopts-changes-to-kc-housing-trust-fund/ [ad_1] KC Tenants chief testified on Mayor Quinton Lucas’ housing trust fund proposal on October 20, 2021. Cortlynn Stark cstark@kcstar.com A Kansas City Council committee on Wednesday approved changes to a housing trust fund ordinance a week after KC tenants rallied outside the mayor’s office, calling for more contributions. Mayor Quinton Lucas proposed an ordinance […]]]>


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KC Tenants chief testified on Mayor Quinton Lucas’ housing trust fund proposal on October 20, 2021.

cstark@kcstar.com

A Kansas City Council committee on Wednesday approved changes to a housing trust fund ordinance a week after KC tenants rallied outside the mayor’s office, calling for more contributions.

Mayor Quinton Lucas proposed an ordinance that, among other things, would make the Department of Housing and Community Development responsible for the housing trust fund and require all units using the funds to remain affordable for at least 20 years.

The changes introduced on Wednesday direct city manager Brian Platt to create an advisory board for the fund within the next 120 days and add social housing to the criteria for evaluating priority projects.

The mayor’s policy director AJ Herrmann told the committee meeting that the mayor’s office is open to alternative governance structures such as a board of directors.

“There does not appear to be a current consensus on what the power of this council should be or who should sit on this council,” he said.

The city established its Housing Trust Fund in December 2018 to help revitalize neighborhoods, develop housing and implement preservation projects. One sticking point has been who oversees the distribution of money from the housing trust fund. KC tenants have asked for a seat at the table to ensure the fund goes to those who need it most.

On Twitter, Lucas wrote that he appreciated the work of his policy director and committee to “pass an order to the full council ensuring that our housing trust fund aligns with HUD goals for housing. really affordable and creates more affordable units for KCMO ”.

Leaders of KC Tenants, a group led by poor tenants and the working class organizing for affordable and safe housing, testified against the mayor’s proposal, calling it a “slush fund for developers.”

In May, the city allocated the $ 12.5 million fund issued as part of the federal COVID relief program. These funds must be allocated by 2024 and spent by 2026. A third of this $ 12.5 million has been allocated to developments.

The mayor’s proposal

Herrmann said at Wednesday’s meeting that progress in spending the funds had been slow because no specific plan was already in place. The mayor’s proposal, he said, provides for specific changes.

These include:

  • Places the administration of the housing trust fund under the direction of the Department of Housing and Community Development under the supervision of the council
  • Requests the ministry to conduct a semi-annual request for proposals process to obtain requests for the use of funds
  • Creates high-level eligibility criteria for all projects funded by the trust fund

“We think it’s important to put some basic parameters in place now to ensure that municipal staff have some direction from the council and can start allocating trust funds to create needed affordable housing,” Herrmann said. .

The eligibility criteria indicate that the city will prioritize applications that maximize:

  • Number of units created per dollar of housing trust fund invested;

  • Total number of affordability months, with longer periods of affordability guaranteed having a higher priority; and

  • Affordability threshold, with higher priority for low income projects.

It also sets a limit on how much of a percentage the city will contribute to a particular project.

Herrmann said a permanent source of funding is still needed. Long-term funding, he said, will come from the city’s budgeting process.

The city must also heed state laws requiring voters to approve new sources of revenue such as taxes, Herrmann said.

Councilor Brandon Ellington, of District 3 in general, criticized the lack of long-term funding and his not having already gone through the budgeting process, saying “I can’t take this seriously.”

Public testimony

KC Tenants leaders called on Lucas to commit to establishing a board of directors of poor and working class tenants, creating social housing, funding police and taxing gentrifiers to provide continued funding to a trust fund for housing, as opposed to one-off investments from developers.

This summer, the organization unveiled its People’s Housing Trust Fund. Funding for this would be withdrawn from sources such as the police department and developers. And the proposed programs would protect tenants’ rights, keep them housed, and create electricity.

About 30 tenants gathered in the boardroom on Wednesday, taking photos after each member shared their story or shared a story on behalf of someone who couldn’t attend.

One woman said that by listening to the committee, she realized they were thinking of the developers, not the residents of Kansas City.

“I still have to live here. And I still deserve the right to affordable housing, not just for 20 years. If we set a minimum of 20 years, we say 20 years works for us, ”she said. “I ask you once again to vote no on this ordinance so that we can again talk about what this looks like for the people of Kansas City and not for the developers who are coming in.”

Jenay Manley, along with KC Tenants, said after the committee that the group “spoke the truth to power and were very clear on the things we wanted.”

“And I think without those voices in the room, without us telling our stories, it wouldn’t have happened,” she said.

And although changes were made to the proposal on Wednesday, Manley said that was not enough.

“We need to create long-term sustainable change and we need to prioritize permanent affordable housing outside the private market, but it actually creates a broader conversation that is important,” Manley said.

Christopher McKinney, director of community impact for the Urban Neighborhood Initiative, spoke in favor of the proposal, calling it “vital” to ensuring funds are used as intended. He asked the committee to add a zoning council to represent different parts of the affordable housing ecosystem as well as private and non-government funding sources.

Councilor Andrea Bough said council needs to listen more.

“This is our opportunity to do something real,” Bough said. “We’re not doing enough, either in this ordinance or in any of the other policies.”

Bough, who represents District 6 as a whole, has pushed to raise the bar of the council.

“We’re talking about Maseratis for downtown baseball,” Bough said later. “We need a Maserati for affordable housing.

Kansas City Star Related Stories

Cortlynn Stark covers City Hall with a focus on fairness for The Kansas City Star. She joined The Star in January 2020 as a breaking reporter. Cortlynn studied journalism and Spanish at Missouri State University.


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