vice president – Adventurebase100 http://adventurebase100.org/ Sat, 26 Mar 2022 05:42:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://adventurebase100.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png vice president – Adventurebase100 http://adventurebase100.org/ 32 32 Student Council Members Join the Cast of Yatogame-chan Kansatsu Nikki TV Anime https://adventurebase100.org/student-council-members-join-the-cast-of-yatogame-chan-kansatsu-nikki-tv-anime/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 12:39:34 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/student-council-members-join-the-cast-of-yatogame-chan-kansatsu-nikki-tv-anime/ Three new cast members have been revealed for season four of Yatogame-chan Kansatsu Nikki, an ongoing short television anime based on Masaki Andou’s regional comic manga about a boy born in Tokyo who befriends an eccentric local girl from Nagoya after he and her family move to Aichi Prefecture. New cast members include: Sumire Uesaka […]]]>

Three new cast members have been revealed for season four of Yatogame-chan Kansatsu Nikki, an ongoing short television anime based on Masaki Andou’s regional comic manga about a boy born in Tokyo who befriends an eccentric local girl from Nagoya after he and her family move to Aichi Prefecture. New cast members include:

A character set of Shou Kochikashi from the upcoming fourth season of the Yatogame-chan Kansatsu Nikki TV anime.  Shou is a blue-haired, blue-eyed high school girl who wears a sailor uniform and captain's cap along with a yellow armband identifying her as a member of the student council.

Sumire Uesaka as Shou Kochikashithe president of the student council.

A character set of Kei Aonaji from the upcoming fourth season of the Yatogame-chan Kansatsu Nikki TV anime.  Kei is a high school girl with red hair and red eyes.  She wears a sailor uniform, a small crown and yellow leggings along with a yellow armband identifying her as a member of the student council.

Sora Tokui as Kei Aonajithe vice president of the student council.

A character set of Kiina Asaka from the upcoming fourth season of the Yatogame-chan Kansatsu Nikki TV anime.  Kiina is a high school girl with pale lilac hair and light purple eyes.  She wears a face mask with a large black

And Reo Kurachi like Kiina Asakathe treasurer of the student council.

Crunchyroll is currently streaming the previous three seasons and describing the story of Yatogame-chan Kansatsu Nikki as following:

After growing up in Tokyo, high school student Jin Kaito moves to Nagoya where he meets Yatogame Monaka, another student who fully showcases her Nagoya dialect. With his cat-like appearance and unvarnished Nagoya dialect, Yatogame won’t open up to him at all. This popular local comedy boosts Nagoya’s status through watching the adorable Yatogame-chan!

The fourth season of Yatogame-chan Kansatsu Nikki The television anime is directed by Hisayoshi Hirasawa and features animation production by Hayabusa Film with cooperation from Creators in Pack. The series will air in Japan on TV Aichi from April 02, 2022, with additional shows to follow on BS11 from April 03, 2022 and AT-X from April 07, 2022.

Sources:

Ota-suke

comedic Natalie

Official Yatogame-chan Kansatsu Nikki TV anime homepage

Copyright Notice: © Masaki Andou・Ichijinsha / Yatogame-chan 4 Production Committee

Crunchyroll-Hime poses for a Crunchyroll banner ad.

Paul Chapman is the host of The Greatest Movie EVER! Podcast and GME! Lively fun time.

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RC&D Council and State Legislature Make Way for PCHS Scope of Practice Upgrades – Franklin County Times https://adventurebase100.org/rcd-council-and-state-legislature-make-way-for-pchs-scope-of-practice-upgrades-franklin-county-times/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 16:27:31 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/rcd-council-and-state-legislature-make-way-for-pchs-scope-of-practice-upgrades-franklin-county-times/ Thanks to a $15,000 grant from the Northwest RC&D Council, made possible by funding from the Alabama Legislature, Phil Campbell High School was able to complete its scope of practice upgrade. The funds were used for the installation of drainage, base and artificial grass. RC&D members, school employees and local officials attended the announcement of […]]]>

Thanks to a $15,000 grant from the Northwest RC&D Council, made possible by funding from the Alabama Legislature, Phil Campbell High School was able to complete its scope of practice upgrade.

The funds were used for the installation of drainage, base and artificial grass. RC&D members, school employees and local officials attended the announcement of the completion of the community development project at the school on February 28.

Northwest Resource Conservation & Development is a 501(c)(3) organization that supports educational and community development projects in Northwest Alabama, serving Franklin, Colbert, Lauderdale, Marion, and Winston counties.

Funds are provided by the state legislature and groups within the counties served apply for grants. RC&D selects the beneficiaries and distributes the funds.

Representative Proncey Robertson explained that schools and sports teams have budgets that could not undertake certain projects without additional funding.

“We are proud to be able to support projects through the North West RC&D council so that there can be a focus on meeting needs beyond what can be covered by core budgets alone,” said said Robertson. “We pride ourselves on filling those holes when we can.”

Robertson said the Legislature tries to provide more funding for RC&D each year so additional projects can be done. “It’s an example of local taxpayers’ money coming back to meet local needs.”

For PCHS coach Kevin Barnwell, carrying out the project is a question of quality and increased safety for the students.

“The improvements to our practice field provide our students with a safe place to practice,” Barnwell explained. “Terrain can become uneven and present safety issues, and our new setup is much better equipped to provide a safe training location. With these upgrades, students can even train safely in the rain. .

Rep. Jamie Kiel expressed enthusiasm for the legislature allocating funds to rural projects, like this one.

“Our coaches and players work hard and deserve proper facilities,” he said, “and I’m thrilled the Alabama legislature can help make that possible.”

Northwest RC&D Vice President Don Barnwell said the Council is proud to be able to help with projects like this.

“We’re able to make a big impact in the counties we serve by allocating these funds, and it’s something we’re excited to be able to do.”

For Lauranne James, Executive Director of Northwest RC&D, driving range upgrades are an important way to improve the student experience.

“We love that we can help bring projects to fruition to benefit our local schools and communities,” she said, “so that needed projects can receive the funding they should have.”

Katernia Cole Coffey, Franklin County Extension Coordinator and Northwest RC&D member, said it was important to provide relief whenever possible.

“This improved training ground will help athletes perform at a higher level while being good for school budgets,” Coffey said. “I’m so glad we can be a part of this worthwhile project and help ease the burden on the school in making these improvements.”

It’s a value that Barry Moore, Chairman of the Franklin County Commission and member of the Northwest RC&D Council, has declared to be valid.

“I appreciate that our state legislature and RC&D office staff are administering these grants,” he said, “and I look forward to seeing the benefits this will bring to the school.”

PCHS Director Darit Riddle also expressed his gratitude for the grant and the completion of the project.

“We are grateful for the support of our local schools by providing the necessary funding for this project,” Riddle said. “It’s something we couldn’t afford otherwise.”

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RC&D Council and State Legislature Make Way for PCHS Scope of Practice Upgrades – Franklin County Times https://adventurebase100.org/rcd-council-and-state-legislature-make-way-for-pchs-scope-of-practice-upgrades-franklin-county-times-2/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/rcd-council-and-state-legislature-make-way-for-pchs-scope-of-practice-upgrades-franklin-county-times-2/ Thanks to a $15,000 grant from the Northwest RC&D Council, made possible by funding from the Alabama Legislature, Phil Campbell High School was able to complete its scope of practice upgrade. The funds were used for the installation of drainage, base and artificial grass. RC&D members, school employees and local officials attended the announcement of […]]]>

Thanks to a $15,000 grant from the Northwest RC&D Council, made possible by funding from the Alabama Legislature, Phil Campbell High School was able to complete its scope of practice upgrade.

The funds were used for the installation of drainage, base and artificial grass. RC&D members, school employees and local officials attended the announcement of the completion of the community development project at the school on February 28.

Northwest Resource Conservation & Development is a 501(c)(3) organization that supports educational and community development projects in Northwest Alabama, serving Franklin, Colbert, Lauderdale, Marion, and Winston counties.

Funds are provided by the state legislature and groups within the counties served apply for grants. RC&D selects the beneficiaries and distributes the funds.

Representative Proncey Robertson explained that schools and sports teams have budgets that could not undertake certain projects without additional funding.

“We are proud to be able to support projects through the North West RC&D council so that there can be a focus on meeting needs beyond what can be covered by core budgets alone,” said said Robertson. “We pride ourselves on filling those holes when we can.”

Robertson said the Legislature tries to provide more funding for RC&D each year so additional projects can be done. “It’s an example of local taxpayers’ money coming back to meet local needs.”

For PCHS coach Kevin Barnwell, carrying out the project is a question of quality and increased safety for the students.

“The improvements to our practice field provide our students with a safe place to practice,” Barnwell explained. “Terrain can become uneven and present safety issues, and our new setup is much better equipped to provide a safe training location. With these upgrades, students can even train safely in the rain. .

Rep. Jamie Kiel expressed enthusiasm for the legislature allocating funds to rural projects, like this one.

“Our coaches and players work hard and deserve proper facilities,” he said, “and I’m thrilled the Alabama legislature can help make that possible.”

Northwest RC&D Vice President Don Barnwell said the Council is proud to be able to help with projects like this.

“We’re able to make a big impact in the counties we serve by allocating these funds, and that’s something we’re happy to be able to do.”

For Lauranne James, Executive Director of Northwest RC&D, driving range upgrades are an important way to improve the student experience.

“We love that we can help bring projects to fruition to benefit our local schools and communities,” she said, “so that needed projects can receive the funding they should have.”

Katernia Cole Coffey, Franklin County Extension Coordinator and Northwest RC&D member, said it was important to provide relief whenever possible.

“This improved training ground will help athletes perform at a higher level while being good for school budgets,” Coffey said. “I’m so glad we can be a part of this worthwhile project and help ease the burden on the school in making these improvements.”

It’s a value that Barry Moore, Chairman of the Franklin County Commission and member of the Northwest RC&D Council, has declared to be valid.

“I appreciate that our state legislature and RC&D office staff are administering these grants,” he said, “and I look forward to seeing the benefits this will bring to the school.”

PCHS Director Darit Riddle also expressed his gratitude for the grant and the completion of the project.

“We are grateful for the support of our local schools by providing the necessary funding for this project,” Riddle said. “It’s something we couldn’t afford otherwise.”

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National Panhellenic Council Celebrates 50 Years of Service and Friendship at MTSU https://adventurebase100.org/national-panhellenic-council-celebrates-50-years-of-service-and-friendship-at-mtsu/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 04:21:01 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/national-panhellenic-council-celebrates-50-years-of-service-and-friendship-at-mtsu/ MURFEESBORO, Tenn. (TN Tribune) – Bronze plaques representing renowned student organizations are in place at Middle Tennessee State University to celebrate the institution’s 50-year relationship with the National Panhellenic Council. Before an audience of fraternity and sorority members dressed in the respective colors of their groups, university and group officials dedicated the plaques on February […]]]>

MURFEESBORO, Tenn. (TN Tribune) – Bronze plaques representing renowned student organizations are in place at Middle Tennessee State University to celebrate the institution’s 50-year relationship with the National Panhellenic Council.

Before an audience of fraternity and sorority members dressed in the respective colors of their groups, university and group officials dedicated the plaques on February 17 in a ceremony at the Student Union.

The member organizations represented at MTSU are the sororities of Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta Sigma Theta, Sigma Gamma Rho, and Zeta Phi Beta and the fraternities of Kappa Alpha Psi, Omega Psi Phi, and Phi Beta Sigma.

These groups, along with Alpha Phi Alpha and Iota Phi Theta fraternities, represent the nationally recognized “Divine 9” historically black fraternities and sororities. In December, 10 plaques measuring 2 feet by 3 feet each were installed on the Student Union Commons, one for each of the “Divine 9” and the tenth to represent the NPHC on campus.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, a member of Phi Beta Sigma, celebrated the Greek groups’ legacy of student leadership and cited the ways they have contributed to campus life over the years.

“Some examples include donating needed items and funds to local and national causes, educating MTSU students on societal topics for cultural awareness, community service projects to support Murfreesboro and Rutherford County , sponsorship of scholarships to help and provide financial assistance to students and many other very worthwhile projects,” said McPhee.

Reverend Deborah Smith Owens, an MTSU alumnus and member of the Eta Psi Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha, recalled the origins of black fraternities and sororities at the university half a century earlier.

“Although we were divided by names of fraternity and sorority, we all had a common goal – to improve the quality of life for ourselves, for our community and for the world, as well as for Greek life on this campus” , said Owens.

Current MTSU National Panhellenic Council Chairman Jalen Everett, a member of Phi Beta Sigma, challenged today’s Greek organizations to follow the lead of civil rights leaders in continuing to work for social justice .

“We must continue to fight for our community in this school, in this city, in this state and in this country,” said Everett, a young exercise science student from Portland, Tennessee.

“As students, we have to be ready to get to work. Our black leaders are aging. It’s our time…to step out of the fringes and use our voice as young leaders to bring about the changes we want to see in our communities.

Everett gave special thanks to McPhee and Debra Sells, vice president of student affairs, for their support in making the plaque dedication possible.

Leslie Merritt, director of Fraternity and Sisterhood Life, applauded all NPHC students, past and present, for their support, as well as the Center for Student Involvement and Leadership and the Student Government Association, who adopted a bill in favor of the project.

“I started this work in 2016 and we discussed how to recognize the importance of the NPHC in a physical way on campus,” Merritt said. “And yet I know that the discussions did not start then, but had been discussed for decades before. Thank you to everyone who participated in these conversations and helped this project to come to fruition.

For more information about NPHC fraternities and sororities, contact Merritt at 615-898-5812 or leslie.merritt@mtsu.edu.

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Academic Council hears updates on 2030 Strategy Team and proposed university-wide ombudsman office https://adventurebase100.org/academic-council-hears-updates-on-2030-strategy-team-and-proposed-university-wide-ombudsman-office/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 05:50:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/academic-council-hears-updates-on-2030-strategy-team-and-proposed-university-wide-ombudsman-office/ The Academic Council heard updates from the 2030 Strategy Team working groups at their February meeting. Provost Sally Kornbluth presented the results of two of the working group discussions to Council. The Education Task Force – established in the spring of 2020 – decided that there were three main ways to develop a new vision […]]]>

The Academic Council heard updates from the 2030 Strategy Team working groups at their February meeting. Provost Sally Kornbluth presented the results of two of the working group discussions to Council.

The Education Task Force – established in the spring of 2020 – decided that there were three main ways to develop a new vision for Duke by 2030, according to Kornbluth: include more undergraduate opportunities in the Duke’s research infrastructure, attract the best undergraduate educators and enable “flexibility and integration” in learning.

“That’s what sets Duke apart from a [Williams College]a [Amherst College]a [Wesleyan University]. We have a large research operation and we want our students to participate,” Kornbluth said.

Additional research opportunities would be added through the new undergraduate curriculum currently being developed and by expanding student-faculty connections, particularly within professional schools.

“It’s a bit difficult to encourage excellence in teaching. And some of our professional school faculty have really enjoyed teaching undergraduates, but find it fiscally and administratively difficult to teach or mentor undergraduates,” Kornbluth said.

Cultural anthropology professor Lee Baker found the proposal “interesting” but questioned whether governance of the curriculum at the two undergraduate schools would remain with their respective faculties.

“Made [the proposal] withdraw from the governance of the Faculty of Engineering and the Arts and Sciences Council? Or are they still going to be in charge of the program? Boulanger asked. “Will there be a Duke degree [as] opposed to a [Trinity College of Arts & Sciences] degree that encompasses all other schools?

Kornbluth responded that curriculum decisions should rest with undergraduate school teachers.

“We already have a lot of teachers from professional schools who participate in Bass Connections, for example, or DukeEngage, et cetera,” Kornbluth said. “They obviously want to engage in undergraduate interactions and activities, but they’ve all been decorated around the edges of the curriculum.”

Kornbluth also proposed to “reinvent contracts, compensation and promotion conditions” for professors. She said giving professors more time to research, mentor and innovate in their teaching may stem from changing teaching loads.

The education task force also discussed changing Duke’s academic calendar to “accommodate different learning experience lengths” and leveraging technology to deliver hybrid learning experiences. .

Kornbluth discussed continuing to invest in faculty who have recently been tenured.

“We know the transition to associate professor level can be an inflection point for faculty,” Kornbluth said. “Just as people are starting to feel liberated in terms of spreading their intellectual wings, there’s a lot more expectation of service, there’s often less guidance and mentorship. And you know, teachers can find it difficult at this point.

She said this new approach could help Duke “stand out, demonstrating Duke’s distinctive investment and commitment to our faculty, and to generating the kind of high-risk, high-reward research that can truly have an impact.” transformative impact”.

Shai Ginsburg, an associate professor in the Asian and Middle Eastern studies department, said the update was geared more toward science teachers. He said instead of the funding structures presented by Kornbluth, humanities professors need more time than their scientific counterparts to conduct research.

“My experience with Duke is that he’s very generous with monetary resources and very stingy with time,” Ginsburg said. “And especially in the humanities, we don’t need laboratories, we need time. And yet, Duke has a sabbatical policy for qualitative humanities and social sciences that falls short of its counterpart. [institutions].”

Kornbluth responded that the research working group’s conversations included discussions of faculty in the humanities and social sciences and that there were “strong voices in this area.”

The next steps for Strategy Team 2030 will be to find ways to fund these initiatives, Kornbluth said.

In other cases

Council also heard updates on a proposal to establish a university-wide ombudsman office. Executive Vice President Daniel Ennis said Duke plans to hire two professional mediators, one for faculty and staff and one for students. Currently, faculty members serve part-time as University Ombudsmen.

New ombudsmen, who offer “neutral and confidential advice” and help mediate disputes and direct resources, would also support staff for the first time.

Trina Jones, a prominent Jerome M. Culp law professor, worried that a single ombudsman serving both faculty and staff would be insufficient.

“We thought it would be important for faculty to have access to different people, as we learned that there was some hesitation among certain sub-groups of faculty to approach an ombudsman due to of that person’s demographics or reputation,” Jones said.

Baker echoed that sentiment, adding that he hoped Duke found a mediator who could see the situations through the eyes of faculty, students and staff.

“We need ombudsmen who really understand student life, really understand faculty life,” Baker said. “And then with the staff, there are so many different positions. A clinician and a cafeteria employee have very different problems. And I just hope we have the ability to have a mediator who has both expertise and empathy and who can see it through their eyes.


Adway S. Wadekar

Adway S. Wadekar is a Trinity freshman and reporter for the News Service. He also contributed to the sports section.

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Former Rochester City Councilman Adam McFadden Sentenced for Fraud https://adventurebase100.org/former-rochester-city-councilman-adam-mcfadden-sentenced-for-fraud/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 18:30:54 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/former-rochester-city-councilman-adam-mcfadden-sentenced-for-fraud/ Adam McFadden, the former Rochester city councilman whose precipitous fall from grace will now land him in jail, presented a conundrum in federal court on Friday. On the one hand, his accomplishments over the years—his work in troubled neighborhoods, his constant encouragement, and his help to disadvantaged youth—are the very accomplishments that have earned him […]]]>

Adam McFadden, the former Rochester city councilman whose precipitous fall from grace will now land him in jail, presented a conundrum in federal court on Friday.

On the one hand, his accomplishments over the years—his work in troubled neighborhoods, his constant encouragement, and his help to disadvantaged youth—are the very accomplishments that have earned him the position of vice-president of the city council. .

But then there was the other half of the equation, and the theft and fraud committed by McFadden, stealing from the very programs he had helped build and the young people he had long helped.

“Most of the sentencing is, in fact, sad,” U.S. District Judge Elizabeth Wolford said Friday when sentencing McFadden for fraud. “This one is particularly unfortunate, Mr. McFadden.”

McFadden previously ran an organization, Quad A for Kids, which provided after-school services to children in poor neighborhoods. McFadden admitted to creating fake invoices for the organization, stealing more than $130,000 that otherwise could have been used for youth services.

Prosecutors have recommended a sentence of 12 to 18 months for McFadden, a recommendation prompted by his cooperation and recent testimony against George Moses, the former chairman of the board of directors of the Rochester Housing Authority who committed his own theft of local non-profit organizations.

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Mia Francisco d’Alvirne signs to play softball with WPI – Lowell Sun https://adventurebase100.org/mia-francisco-dalvirne-signs-to-play-softball-with-wpi-lowell-sun/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 12:02:28 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/mia-francisco-dalvirne-signs-to-play-softball-with-wpi-lowell-sun/ Whether it’s scoring a double or passing an exam, Mia Francisco has always had a knack for succeeding in the clutch.It’s a talent that has followed her through the past three years at Alvirne High School and will no doubt follow her to Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 2023. Francisco recently signed a letter of intent […]]]>

Whether it’s scoring a double or passing an exam, Mia Francisco has always had a knack for succeeding in the clutch.
It’s a talent that has followed her through the past three years at Alvirne High School and will no doubt follow her to Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 2023. Francisco recently signed a letter of intent to play ball with the WPI Engineers next season.
“It feels good,” said Francisco, a senior shortstop for the Alvirne Broncos and the nationally recognized Polar Crush club softball program. “I’m really excited.”
A star infielder, Francisco was courted by several schools in the area, before receiving a call from WPI softball coach Whitney Goldstien, inviting him to visit the campus. She already knew the coach who had attended several of her softball camps during his career.
“I’ve known her for a while now,” said 17-year-old Francisco. “She was coaching at Lesley before moving to WPI where she contacted me. I was obviously very interested in WPI academically. I jumped at this opportunity and here we are.
The 5-foot-1 infielder will major in health sciences, with the goal of eventually becoming a pediatric nurse practitioner.
When she officially visited the campus in September, Francisco liked what she saw.
“I met the coach and a few upperclassmen,” Francisco said, noting that shortstop Alicia Salvalzo is an Alvirne graduate who played on the same team as Mia in her freshman year. . “I was pleasantly surprised by the campus. From the outside you can’t see much, but it’s really big and has lots of sports facilities. I also really liked the girls in the team, that helped me. I signed up a few weeks later.
Francisco is currently a four-year college starter for the Alvirne Broncos softball team, playing both shortstop and second base. She was one of the cornerstones of the program during a difficult time, playing under a different head coach each season.
“It was tough,” Francisco said. “But I love all my teammates and the girls I grew up with.”
Alvirne has yet to announce his new softball coach for 2022 as of press time. Francisco said one of his AAU coaches is among those vying for the job. No matter who they choose, however, she remains positive, especially looking at the talent on the training camp roster.
“We only lost two girls last year, so we should be competitive again this year,” Francisco said. “During my time here we haven’t been great due to the coaching situation and losing my second season to Covid, but the first year we were much better. Last year wasn’t our best, but this season should be much better.
Born and raised in Hudson, NH, Francisco first took the diamond at age five, playing T-Ball in both Lowell and Hudson’s hometown. She became very fond of soccer, quickly becoming a multi-sport athlete. Currently a girl for all seasons at Alvirne, Mia is a year-round athlete for the Broncos, playing football in the fall and at the running track in the winter. She is also captain of the soccer and softball teams.
When not on the court, Mia is a leader in the class with a 3.9 GPA, being class vice president and a member of the National Honors Society, National Technical Honors Society, Student Athletic Leadership Council, from the Student Council and the Health Trades Program at Alvirne.
His good grades largely contributed to earning a place in the WPI.
“I always knew I wanted to be in the medical field growing up, so grades are always very important,” Francisco said. “As soon as WPI appeared on my radar, I knew I had to maintain my grades to go. It’s not too difficult, with the help of my family and classmates it’s easy to balance.
While maintaining her success as a student-athlete, Mia also devotes much of her time to athletics and unified events as well as the Hudson Food Pantry. Other volunteer endeavors include the Hudson Women’s Softball League and the Hudson Recreation Department, where she hopes to pass on her love for athletics to the younger generation.
“Our college coach is actually president of the Hudson girls softball league, so with her I’ve been able to run a lot of clinics and coach the teams, just to help out,” Francisco said. “I remember when I was so young when the girls in high school helped me. I liked it a lot. Now that I’m able to do it, it’s great.”
For now, however, Francisco is only focused on getting back into the swing with Alvirne softball this coming season.
“I’m super excited to start,” Francisco said. “We have already started training. It should be a fun season.
And she plans to go out swinging.

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Tatarstan State Council Social Policy Committee discusses youth — RealnoeVremya.com https://adventurebase100.org/tatarstan-state-council-social-policy-committee-discusses-youth-realnoevremya-com/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/tatarstan-state-council-social-policy-committee-discusses-youth-realnoevremya-com/ The First Deputy Youth Minister of Tatarstan asked MPs to help reduce the social mortgage rate for young families The exodus of young people from Tatarstan to major Russian cities is increasing to reach the oil-rich southeast of the republic. “Bugulma, Almetievsk, Leninogorsk. 60% of young people left the region last year,” Tatarstan’s First Deputy […]]]>

The First Deputy Youth Minister of Tatarstan asked MPs to help reduce the social mortgage rate for young families

The exodus of young people from Tatarstan to major Russian cities is increasing to reach the oil-rich southeast of the republic. “Bugulma, Almetievsk, Leninogorsk. 60% of young people left the region last year,” Tatarstan’s First Deputy Minister of Youth Affairs Rinat Sadykov told a meeting of the parliamentary committee for social policy. Giving a speech to the State Council of Tatarstan with a report on the strategy of state youth policy until 2030, he almost made the public understand that young people do not go there for fun . 400,000 young people out of a million are officially employed, few families receive allowances when buying a house, while wages in the republic are low. MEPs propose to maintain migration by introducing a social pension. Read more in Realnoe Vremya’s report.

Three years after the division into youth and sport

Maintaining the migration of young people of working age from Tatarstan to other regions remains a priority task in the strategy of state youth policy until 2030, said the First Deputy Minister of Youth Affairs of Tatarstan Rinat Sadykov at the meeting of the Social Policy Committee of the State Council of Tatarstan.

The management of the Ministry of Youth reported on the strategy adopted three years ago to parliamentarians. In fact, the document became the basis for the activity of the new ministry created after the division of the Ministry of Sports of Tatarstan. Then Damir Fattakhov, who later became vice-president of the Federal Youth Agency, chaired the Ministry of Youth.

All those whose work is related in one way or another to the young people gathered at the meeting. Tatarstan Human Rights Ombudsman Saria Saburskaya, Deputy Minister of Labor, Employment and Social Protection of Tatarstan Natalia Butayeva were among them. Tatneft Deputy Director General of Social Policy Nail Mukhamadeyev joined by teleconference.

Perhaps the report was a rehearsal before the final meeting, which was supposed to take place on January 31, probably with the President of Tatarstan. The problem of youth exodus from the regions has already started to have a negative impact on the prospects for economic growth and economic diversification.

All those whose work is related in one way or another to the young people gathered at the meeting. Photo: tatarstan.ru

7 key tasks of Tatarstan’s youth strategy

In a speech to deputies, Rinat Sadykov voiced seven key tasks of the youth policy strategy. As his presentation read, it is about the creation of conditions for the multifaceted development of youth, the introduction of innovative educational technologies as well as the creation of a value system of healthy lifestyles.

However, these narratives are poorly connected to the real life and career building demands of young people. As the report says, today the strategy of state youth policy until 2030 includes seven sectoral sub-programs aimed primarily at youth recreation.

The Organization of children’s and youth vacations in 2019-2025 is still the most expensive that envisages a major overhaul of kindergartens. According to Rinat Sadykov, one billion rubles were allocated for these purposes last year.

The development of social and engineering infrastructure under the state program Youth Policy Development in the Republic of Tatarstan in 2019-2025 was the second most expensive sub-program. 750 million rubles have been donated to repair camp walkways over the past three years.

The Organization of children’s and youth vacations in 2019-2025 is still the most expensive that envisages a major overhaul of kindergartens. Photo: realnoevremya.ru

In addition, 363 million rubles have been allocated this year to create youth centers in municipalities. Other programs aim to develop the patriotic and voluntary movement. The transformation of mental aid centers — of which there are 15 — occupies a special place in the strategy. As noted by Sadykov, they need to change their ideology and become more friendly and open towards teenagers and at the same time preserve the privacy of dates.

No job, no home or why the young go away

Then he moved on to the main challenges facing young people. He identified three expected problems: employment, the housing problem, free time. According to him, about 400,000 people work today in large companies and services. However, salary expectations for university graduates do not match vacancies.

170,000 young people live in the countryside. As Sadykov later noted, if they were offered a good job with a salary of 35-40 thousand rubles, they would not rush to leave the homeland. Other young people work illegally.

The issue of housing has generated lively debate. Sadykov said that four subsidy mechanisms for buying a house for young people work in the republic. In fact, none of them have spread. First, a youth program where 17.5 million rubles in federal grants and 50 million rubles in Republican money continue to operate. Last year, 50 families managed to buy a house, they received from 600,000 to 2 million rubles in subsidies.

Sadykov said that four subsidy mechanisms for buying a house for young people work in the republic. In fact, none of them have spread. Photo: realnoevremya.ru

“We asked the National Housing Fund to lower the rate to 5% per year”

According to him, the social mortgage program for young people has not met expectations. In a year and a half, 738 families have managed to improve their living conditions, while 1,500 families have requested it. Sadykov said the terms of the program remain difficult to adhere to.

“We have offered to reduce the down payment from 10% to 5% and the interest rate from 7% to 5%,” he said, adding that he was continuing discussions with the National Housing Fund. “Young people fear loan addiction, don’t want to ruin their credit history, but their purchasing power does not increase.”

Then Deputy Director General of Social Policy of Tatneft Nail Mukhamadeyev offered to provide social rent unless they “have both feet on the ground”. In conclusion, MEPs affirmed that the problem of the employment of young people, in the first place of young specialists, remained topical. They also noted the insufficient effectiveness of the mechanisms for including young people in public life in the cities and neighborhoods of the republic, especially in the countryside, the cities. The migration of young people from the countryside continues. While the proportion of young people in difficult circumstances who encounter negative tendencies towards alcoholism, delinquency, on the other hand, is increasing.

Young people are afraid of loan addiction, do not want to spoil their credit history, but their purchasing power does not increase, Sadykov noted. Photo: realnoevremya.ru

At the end of the speech, the first deputy minister of youth of the republic told reporters that the problem of youth migration is inter-governmental, since the Ministry of Youth works together with the Ministry of Economy of Tatarstan. According to him, the points of growth are determined during the creation of the agglomerations where the workforce will be needed. “That’s why we can’t say they should stay here and go,” Sadykov added.

Luiza Ignatieva

Tatarstan

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Pushing for Tougher Sentences in Sexual Assault Cases in Indonesia | Sexual Assault News https://adventurebase100.org/pushing-for-tougher-sentences-in-sexual-assault-cases-in-indonesia-sexual-assault-news/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 23:42:43 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/pushing-for-tougher-sentences-in-sexual-assault-cases-in-indonesia-sexual-assault-news/ Medan, Indonesia – It was every parent’s worst nightmare. As six distraught families watched, the man accused of sexually abusing their daughters was sentenced to 10 years in prison by the district court in the city of Medan, Indonesia. “Our children,” gasped the mother of one, as she slumped in her chair, raising fears she […]]]>

Medan, Indonesia – It was every parent’s worst nightmare.

As six distraught families watched, the man accused of sexually abusing their daughters was sentenced to 10 years in prison by the district court in the city of Medan, Indonesia.

“Our children,” gasped the mother of one, as she slumped in her chair, raising fears she might faint.

Benyamin Sitepu, a 37-year-old Christian priest who was also headmaster of the Galilea Hosana school in Medan, was sentenced to five years less than the maximum sentence of 15 years sought by the prosecution.

The presiding judge said he gave Sitepu a shorter sentence because the priest had apologized for his crimes and had previously signed a settlement agreement with two of the victims’ families.

The prosecution and Sitepu are appealing the conviction.

Reacting to the verdict, Andreas Harsono, a researcher at Human Rights Watch Indonesia, told Al Jazeera that the sentence was too short, especially given Sitepu’s age and Indonesia’s remission system under which most prisoners serve about two-thirds of their sentence.

If Sitepu gets a reduced sentence, he could only serve around seven years behind bars and be free before he even turns 50.

“If he gets remission, he will be a relatively young man when he is released and will still be a danger to children,” said Harsono, who added that the short prison sentence would only add to the trauma of the children. victims.

Ranto Sibarani, a human rights lawyer in Medan who represented the families, said they were disappointed that Sitepu had not received the maximum possible sentence and called on religious organizations to take more responsibility for the crimes that took place. occur in the institutions they operate.

“If people commit crimes under the banner of the church, for example, then the church should apologize,” Sibarani told Al Jazeera.

“Religious leaders must make public statements that they support the legal process in all cases of sexual assault and that they support the rights of victims to take legal action.”

The allegations against Benyamin Sitepu came to light last year after a young girl told her grandmother she had been abused [Aisyah Llewellyn/Al Jazeera]

Medan Primary School became the center of a sexual assault scandal in March 2021, when six female students came forward after one told her grandparents she had been abused by the priest.

The girls, who were 13 at the time of the assaults, said Sitepu locked them in his office under the guise of teaching “special classes” such as ballet and touched them inappropriately.

One of the students alleges that Sitepu took her to a local hotel, telling school staff that he was taking her to off-site karate lessons, where he sexually assaulted and forced her to give him a blowjob.

After the student came forward, she was forced to take local police to the hotel and identify the room in which she was regularly assaulted – which Harsono and Sibarani criticized as adding to her trauma.

Sibarani added that in his view, Indonesian judges are reluctant to convict religious leaders or give them long prison terms because of historical ideas about respecting those in positions of religious authority.

new punishment

In recent months, Indonesia has fallen on hard times with a number of disturbing cases of child sexual abuse making headlines across the country, many of which have implicated religious institutions.

In the West Java city of Bandung, the principal of a Muslim boarding school, Herry Wirawan, 36, was arrested and charged with raping 13 of his female students and impregnating at least eight of them from 2016.

On January 11, the prosecutor handling the case requested the death penalty if Wirawan is found guilty.

Ranto Sibarani, a human rights lawyer who represented the families, speaks to reportersThe families’ lawyer Ranto Sibarani is appealing the sentence because it is too lenient, especially since Sitepu is only 37 years old. [Aisyah Llewellyn/Al Jazeera]

Under Indonesian law, the maximum sentence in child sexual assault cases is generally 15 years, although judges can use their sentencing discretion if a case is deemed particularly harmful.

The prosecution also called for Wirawan to be chemically castrated under a new law that was signed by Indonesian President Joko Widodo a year ago following the brutal gang rape of a 14-year-old student in Bengkulu in 2016. The punishment has not yet been applied. .

On January 20, Lukas Lucky Ngalngola, known as “Brother Angelo”, a Catholic priest who ran an orphanage on the outskirts of Jakarta which housed more than 40 children, was jailed for 14 years for sexually abusing children whose he was in charge.

Delivering his judgement, the presiding judge, Ahmad Fadil, referred to the 47-year-old priest’s “despicable acts” and said his behavior had been particularly shocking for “a cleric who should have set a good example and who would have must have known that his actions were contrary to religious teachings.”

As the judge delivered his sentence via video link due to the coronavirus pandemic, Ngalngola raised his hands in prayer.

“They feel invincible, hiding behind their religion,” Sibarani said. “Who will stand up for the victims when the perpetrators are considered respected members of the community?

Ustadz Martono, a Muslim scholar and president of the United In Diversity Forum, told Al Jazeera that sexual assault cases involving religious organizations or religious leaders in Indonesia are often handled internally for fear of shaming the organizations that the chiefs represent.

“My wish is that these kinds of cases will be dealt with in a much more open way,” he said. “They must be treated transparently in accordance with the law.”

Indonesian President Joko Widodo, wearing a brown batik shirt, explains a point during a conversationLast year, Indonesian President Joko Widodo signed a new law allowing chemical castration of those convicted of child molestation. The courts have yet to use the sentence [File: Willy Kurniawan/Reuters]

Members of the Christian community also agree that more needs to be done and that religious organizations speaking out publicly can help authorities be less reluctant to make arrests and bring cases to trial.

“We support and appreciate the steps taken by the police and prosecutors to deal with the Benyamin Sitepu case in Medan and punish the perpetrator,” said Alex Ramandey, Deputy Secretary General of the Central Leadership Council of the Indonesian Christian Youth Movement. (GAMKI). Jazeera.

“Especially when the abuser is also a church figure who has embarrassed Christians.”

Ramadey adds that religious organizations should educate parents of children in their care on how to recognize and report such cases and support those going through the legal process.

It is unclear how many cases of assaults involving minors occur each year in Indonesia, as many cases go unreported to authorities.

According to the Indonesian Witness and Victim Protection Agency (LPSK), 288 child victims applied for protection in 2021. Of these, more than 65% were victims of sexual violence.

LPSK Vice President Edwin Partogi Pasaribu said 25 victims had suffered sexual violence in educational institutions.

“We need to respect people online and their religious beliefs, but they also need to be judged on their actions,” Martono said.

“If people are going to break the law, then they shouldn’t be religious leaders. We shouldn’t be embarrassed by the silence.

“Morally, we all have a responsibility and we need to recognize when these crimes are happening and not cover them up.

“If we say nothing, we are complicit.

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San Diego council committee advances ordinance governing police oversight board https://adventurebase100.org/san-diego-council-committee-advances-ordinance-governing-police-oversight-board/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://adventurebase100.org/san-diego-council-committee-advances-ordinance-governing-police-oversight-board/ SAN DIEGO- The San Diego City Council’s Public Safety and Liveable Neighborhoods Committee voted 4-0 Friday to move forward with a revised draft of the ordinance that will shape the city’s new Police Practices Commission. The proposed ordinance has been in the works since last February, when the same committee ordered the city attorney’s office […]]]>

The San Diego City Council’s Public Safety and Liveable Neighborhoods Committee voted 4-0 Friday to move forward with a revised draft of the ordinance that will shape the city’s new Police Practices Commission.

The proposed ordinance has been in the works since last February, when the same committee ordered the city attorney’s office to draft a proposed ordinance for the commission, which was created in late 2020 after nearly 75% of voters voted approved the ballot Measure B. This measure dissolved the city’s existing police review board – which had no investigative authority – and authorized the creation of a commission with investigative powers, independent review and audit of the San Diego Police Department.

The Public Safety and Liveable Neighborhoods Committee, chaired by Pro Tempore Council President Monica Montgomery Steppe, rejected an early draft of the ordinance last June. Critics argued that the draft did not give the commission enough power or independence and fell far short of what Measure B had promised.

A month later, City Attorney Mara Elliott offered outside legal counsel to help revise the ordinance, and that draft proposal was made public last week. Several social justice groups held community meetings to discuss the latest proposal, which many local activists said was an improvement over the first iteration, but still fell short of the target.

During Friday’s special meeting, dozens of community members, as well as current members of the Policing Practices Commission, spoke out against parts of the ordinance they said still needed improvement.

Among the main concerns was language that could ban people from the commission who have criminal convictions on their record. People who oppose the restriction say it excludes important prospects of those who have been directly affected by the police.

Community members also asked the committee not to allow negotiation sessions on the ordinance between the police union and the city, fearing that the union would try to weaken it. Others have expressed concern that language allowing for independent investigations into shootings and allegations of police misconduct is still not strong enough.

“My main concern is that the records section needs to be more robust,” Doug Case, the first vice president of the Police Practices Commission, told the committee during public comments. “To fulfill our mission to review and evaluate police department policies, procedures and practices, we require unfettered access to all records maintained by the city…To make informed recommendations regarding discipline (for officers) … we need specific information permission to access disciplinary records.

Attorney Andrea St. Julian, author of the charter amendment that became Measure B on behalf of Women Occupy San Diego, and also author of a “voters’ ordinance” that community members had championed in instead of the one drafted by the city attorney’s office, asked the committee to delay approval of the draft ordinance to give the community more time to review it.

St. Julian said the “change in definition of investigations” from the first draft order to the second is “unfortunately not quite there yet, in terms of solving the problem.” She also argued that “collective bargaining must be abolished”.

Montgomery Steppe, a strong advocate for police reform, told community members that she shared some of their concerns and was grateful for their input, but was “proud of what we have in front of us today. ‘today’. Montgomery Steppe offered to approve the ordinance and send it to the full council.

“As I have truly trusted (the) community and taken this contribution, I would simply ask for the extension of that same trust and commitment,” she said, explaining her decision not to delay the sent to council. “I have to, in my position, assess the law, and…even when it comes to accountability to the police, one of the only groups that has a bill of rights specifically for them.

“And so, under all of that, I believe we’ve crafted an order that respects the spirit and intent of Measure B, and is also legally authorized based on the police officers’ bill of rights, based on ( the) city charter … based on a lot of labor laws that we have to adhere to,” she said.

St. Julian and Maresa Martin Talbert, co-chairs of San Diegans for Justice, released a statement after the meeting thanking Montgomery Steppe and the three other committee board members for making changes to the proposed order throughout the meeting. week and at the Friday meeting.

“Although we were unable to meet all of our requests, we are encouraged by the progress made today,” the statement said. “Our main concerns remain that we will not allow the results of collective bargaining to control Commission proceedings and ensure the public nature of all CPP activities, as permitted by law. We look forward to working with the community, Council Chair Sean Elo-Rivera, and the rest of Council members to take further steps to address these concerns.

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